UW Madison Chemistry Department Newsletter for 10/15/2012

Bucky UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY NEWSLETTER
XXXVI - No. 31 October 15th, 2012

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Laura Kiessling Wins 2013 ACS Claude S. Hudson Award
Professor Laura Kiessling won a 2013 Claude S. Hudson Award from the ACS Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry. You make us proud, Congratulations Laura!
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2012 Dates of Finance/Department Meetings
Department/Executive Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 9341 Chemistry

October 16th, 2012 November 13th, 2012 December 11th, 2012 February 12th, 2012
March 12th, 2012 April 16th, 2012 May 14th, 2012  

Finance Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 1130

October 23rd, 2012 November 6th, 2012 November 20th, 2012 December 4th, 2012
December 18th, 2012 January 22nd, 2012 February 19th, 2012 March 5th, 2012
March 19th, 2012 April 2nd, 2012 April 23rd, 2012 May 7th, 2012

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SEMINARS
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Tuesday, October 16th, 2012 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building.  Professor Gregory Hartland, University of Norte Dame. "Transient Absorption Microscopy Studies of Single Metal and Semiconductor Nanostructures"
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Wednesday, October 17th, 2012 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Gordon Miller, Iowa State University. "The Zintl-Klemm Concept: How Far Can It Go?"
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Wednesday, October 17th, 2012 - Post Doctoral Seminar Series, 12:30 p.m., Room 9341 Chemistry Building. Professor Tehshik Yoon, UW Madison. "So ... You Still Want to be a Professor?"
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Thursday, October 18th, 2012 - Materials Science Program Seminar, 4:00 p.m., Room 265, Materials Science & Engineering Building. David C. Venerus, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL. "Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Polymers and its Molecular Origins"
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Friday, October 19th, 2012 - ECT Seminar, 12:00 p.m., 1025 Engineering Centers Building. Colleen Hansel, Assistant Professor,  Environmental Sciences, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
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Monday, October 22nd, 2012 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor William Tolman, University of Minnesota. "From the Bioinorganic Chemistry of Copper to Metal-Catalyzed Cyclic Ester Polymerizations: Insights from Mechanistic Studies"
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Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Graeme Henkelman, University of Texas at Austin. "Correlating Structure and Function for Nanoparticle Catalysts"
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Wednesday, October 24th, 2012 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Liviu Mirica, Washington University. "Oxidative Reactivity of Pd(III) and Pd(IV) Complexes Supported by Flexible Multidentate Ligands"
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Thursday, October 25th, 2012 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Amos B. Smith, University of Pennsylvania.
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Thursday, October 25th, 2012 - Analytical /Materials Science Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joel Pedersen, UW Madison, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
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Friday, October 26th, 2012 - Chemistry Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Carl Djerassi, Stanford University.
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Monday, October 29th, 2012 - TCI Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor Gregory Beran, University of California-Riverside. "Predicting Molecular Crystal Properties With Quatum Chemistry"
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Monday, November 5th, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Ivan Rayment lab - Presenter and title TBA.
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Monday, December 3rd, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Katrina Forest lab - Presenter and title TBA.
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Monday, February 4th, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Yongna Xing lab - Presenter and title TBA.
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Monday, March 4th, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Jim Keck lab - Presenter and title TBA.
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Monday, April 1st, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Sam Butcher lab - Presenter and title TBA.
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Monday, May 6th, 2012 - 2012-2013 X-Ray Superuser Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1220 in the new Biochemical Sciences Building on Henry Mall. Presenter and title TBA.
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The 43rd Annual Once Upon a Christmas Cheery, In the Lab of Shakhashiri
December 1 & 2, 2012
Shows on Saturday, Dec. 1 at 1:00 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 2 at 1:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Room 1351 Chemistry
Tickets are free, but must be reserved visit: http://www.scifun.org for details.

2012 Xmas show

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2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Did the 'Right' Science Get Its Due?
As president of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, I applaud the recipients of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Some might wonder about the world's most prestigious chemistry prize being awarded for research in biology and medicine. Drama and controversy often accompany selection of Nobel Prize winners. But in the past, controversy usually involved questions on whether the Nobel selection committees gave credit to the right people. The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry may be raising questions about whether the right science got its due.
Robert J. Lefkowitz, of Duke University, and Brian K. Kobilka, of Stanford, are M.D.s, medical doctors, not the Ph.D.s who mainly populate the corridors of chemistry. Although medical doctors, both new Nobel laureates do have strong chemistry connections. Lefkowitz, for instance, is a professor of medicine and biochemistry. Kobilka's undergraduate degree is in both biology and chemistry and Lefkowitz's undergrad is in chemistry. They have published more than 30 research research papers in ACS' suite of more than 40 peer-reviewed scientific journals, and all of those articles are being made available without charge for the next week. The topic of the prize – G-coupled protein receptors -- also has recieved extensive coverage in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly that is a mainstay for chemists, policymakers, and others around the world. One was a cover story.
Chemistry was the most important science for Alfred Nobel's famous research -- the invention of dynamite, an explosive safer than nitroglycerin that preserved life and limb for the workers who built bridges, roads and the infrastructure of modern society. In Nobel's day and, indeed, until well into the 20th century, chemistry was chemistry. Biology was biology. Medicine was medicine. Chemists developed the medications that doctors used to treat disease. But to a large extent, there were more-or-less distinct boundaries between scientific research in biology-medicine and chemistry.
But the chemistry of today is no longer the chemistry of Alfred Nobel's time, or even of a few decades ago. Things have changed. The traditional borders between chemistry and other fields -- especially biology -- are blurring. And I think the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was a fantastic development, a dramatic illustration of how chemistry has become so central to other fields of science. There have been others. Remember the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry? It was biology at heart -- for research on how structures called ribosomes translate the genetic code in DNA into the proteins of life. Biology's overlap into these prizes should not be surprising. After all, living things are chemical systems, the most complicated chemical systems imaginable. And life stripped to its most basics is a series of chemical reactions. Chemistry permeates all the sciences. Its importance is so all-pervasive that chemistry not only has broken down traditional barriers in science, but even risks losing its own identity.
The 2012 Nobel Prize relates directly to chemistry and chemistry's role in all science, especially the biological sciences. Thousands of pharmaceutical chemists, for instance, rely on this work every day in the quest to develop new medicines. Fully half of our prescription drugs have connections to G-coupled protein receptors and more are in the works. Biology and chemistry -- the molecular sciences -- have walked hand-in-hand since life first appeared on Earth almost 4 billion years ago. And they are marching together into the 21st century for the benefit of humanity, promising to solve some of the great global challenges. These challenges include population growth, limited natural resources, malnutrition, disease, climate change, violence and war, and the denial of basic human rights -- especially the right to benefit from scientific and technological progress.
Link to article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bassam-z-shakhashiri/nobel-prize-chemistry....
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500 MHz NMR Spectrometer Available For General Use
All NMR users,
We are ready to open the two new 500 MHz NMR spectrometers up for general use.  Both spectrometers are outstanding additions to the department's major instrumentation.  Details are provided on the NMR facility website (soon to be updated), but very briefly:
-- Callisto:  State-of-the-art 13C sensitivity, > 150 times faster than our old 500s (and in case you're wondering, our old spectrometers in 13C sensitivity were pretty good; i.e. callisto has enabling technology for 13C).  Very good 1H sensitivity.  13C and 1H only.
-- Persephone:  State-of-the-art broadband and variable temperature capabilities.  19F, 31P, 29Si, etc. (essentially all NMR-active nuclei) are available with exceptional sensitivity.
Training is required for all users on both spectrometers.  We'll appreciate larger groups clustering for requests for training.  Callisto will initially be available via IconNMR, similar to the 400 (Artemis), so training there will not take long.  Persephone will be used via TopSpin, so expect a longer training session there.
Email me or Monika with your request for training.  Please include brief information about your research needs, including nuclei and temperature ranges.
Some aspects of the instruments' use are not finalized, in particular scheduling for different types of use: mix of shorter and longer experiments on callisto; when extended VT is available, when VT is more limited on persephone; etc.  We'll look for feedback from you to assist us in settling such issues.
Installation of 2H capabilities and extended VT on persephone is not complete.  And many aspects of more complex experiments have not yet been tested.  We'll appreciate your continued patience as the staff work on these details.
Charlie Fry
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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
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NONE FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS
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The Department of Chemistry of the University of Nevada, Reno seeks applicants for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Physical/Analytical Chemistry. Duties include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and establishing an experimental research program in physical or analytical chemistry. A doctoral degree in Physical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, or a closely related field, and postdoctoral research experience are required. Preferred qualifications include evidence of ability and motivation to teach effectively at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the area of physical chemistry, or physical and analytical chemistry; and evidence of ability and strong commitment to establish an active and innovative experimental research program in physical chemistry and/or analytical chemistry. Preferred research programs would complement and extend current faculty research see: http://www.chem.unr.edu/faculty/research.php. For application information including the complete position description, required and preferred qualifications, and online application instructions, please view: https://www.unrsearch.com/postings/11603. Application review will begin November 27, 2012. The University of Nevada, Reno is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Women and under-represented groups are encouraged to apply. For further information about the position or search, contact: the Search Chair, Professor Kent M. Ervin, ervin@unr.edu, 775-784-6676, or the Search Coordinator, Ms. Brady Janes, bradyj@unr.edu, phone: 775-682-8304.
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Washington University in St. Louis. Endowed Professorship in Climate Change. The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (http://eps.wustl.edu/) and the International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES) (http://i-cares.wustl.edu) at Washington University in St. Louis invite applications for an endowed professorship in Climate Change. We are particularly interested in innovative and accomplished scientists whose research addresses Earth's climate change in ways that complement and extend our existing strengths in geochemistry, geology, and/or ecology.
The successful candidate for this position will assume a tenured primary appointment in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. We are targeting a hire at the associate professor level, although truly exceptional candidates at the assistant professor level will also be considered. The successful candidate will be expected to develop and promote cross-disciplinary interactions as part of I-CARES, a university-wide initiative in global energy and environmental issues. The successful candidate must have a PhD, will maintain an externally funded and internationally-recognized research program, will teach both undergraduate and graduate courses, and will serve as a research mentor for students and post-doctoral research associates. Additional duties will include departmental and university-wide service. Competitive start-up funding, laboratory development resources and ancillary support commensurate with the candidate's qualifications are available with this chaired position, as well as access to the University's 2,000 acre field station, the Tyson Research Center (www.tyson.wustl.edu).
Consideration of applicants will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled, with priority given to applicants who submit materials before December 15, 2012. Applicants should submit the following materials as a single pdf file: cover letter; current curriculum vitae; statement of research and teaching interests; and the names and contact information of four individuals who can serve as references upon request. Application materials must be submitted electronically to: icares.search@eps.wustl.edu. Questions regarding the search process can be directed to Raymond Arvidson (arvidson@wunder.wustl.edu) Chair of the Search Committee.
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POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS
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NONE FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thanks.
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DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.
NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON OCTOBER 22nd, 2012