Chemistry Newsletter - 12/10/2001

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter


XXV No. 41 December 10th, 2001

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Newsletter Holiday Schedule

Monday, December 17th, will be the last newsletter of the year. The next newsletter will be on 1-7-2002.

Thank You and Happy Holidays!

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department Meetings --- Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 8335 Chemistry

December 11th, 2001 January 8th, 2002
February 12th, 2002 March 12th, 2002 April 9th, 2002 May 14th, 2002

Finance Committee Meetings --- Tuesdays ---1:20 PM - Chair's Office

December 18th, 2001 January 15th, 2002 February 5th, 2002
February 19th, 2002 March 5th, 2002 March 19th, 2002 April 2nd, 2002
April 16th, 2002 May 7th, 2002 May 21st, 2002

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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, December 11th, 2001 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 1:00 p.m., Room 1610 Engineering Hall. Kristi Anseth, University of Colorado, Boulder. "Photopolymerization of Degradable Polymer Networks and Their Medical Applications"

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Thursday, December 13th, 2001 - Organic Seminar - Industrial McElvain Seminar, 11:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry. Eric M. Gordon, Sunesis.

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Wednesday, January 23rd, 2002 - Inorganic Seminar, 1:20 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Bob Clark, Graduate Student.

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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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Voight EA; Rein C; Burke SD.

Formal synthesis of (-)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) via desymmetrization by ring-closing metathesis.

TETRAHEDRON LETTERS 2001, Vol 42, Iss 50, pp 8747-8749.

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Liu ZX; Somsook E; White CB; Rosaaen KA; Landis CR.

Kinetics of initiation, propagation, and termination for the [rac-(C2H4(1-indenyl)(2))ZrMe][MeB(C6F5)(3)]-catalyzed polymerization of 1-hexene.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2001, Vol 123, Iss 45, pp 11193-11207.

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Gihring TM; Banfield JF.

Arsenite oxidation and arsenate respiration by a new Thermus isolate.

FEMS MICROBIOLOGY LETTERS 2001, Vol 204, Iss 2, pp 335-340.

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Cao XP; Hamers RJ.

Silicon surfaces as electron acceptors: Dative bonding of amines with Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2001, Vol 123, Iss 44, pp 10988-10996.

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Woll MG; Lai JR; Guzei IA; Taylor SJC; Smith MEB; Gellman SH.

Parallel sheet secondary structure in gamma-peptides.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2001, Vol 123, Iss 44, pp 11077-11078.

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Park C; Raines RT.

Quantitative analysis of the effect of salt concentration on enzymatic catalysis.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2001, Vol 123, Iss 46, pp 11472-11479.

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Gunji T; Ozawa M; Abe Y; West R.

Preparation of C-60-silica hybrid monolith by sol-gel process.

JOURNAL OF SOL-GEL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 2001, Vol 22, Iss 3, pp 219-224.

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Schmedake TA; Haaf M; Paradise BJ; Millevolte AJ; Powell DR; West R.

Electronic and steric properties of stable silylene ligands in metal(0) carbonyl complexes.

JOURNAL OF ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY 2001, Vol 636, Iss 1-2, pp 17-25.

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Harriman JE.

Distance and entropy for density matrices.

JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 2001, Vol 115, Iss 20, pp 9223-9232.

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Leland PA; Staniszewski KE; Kim BM; Raines RT.

Endowing human pancreatic ribonuclease with toxicity for cancer cells.

JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 2001, Vol 276, Iss 46, pp 43095-43102.

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Lee HJ; Goodrich TT; Corn RM.

SPR imaging measurements of 1-D and 2-D DNA microarrays created from microfluidic channels on gold thin films.

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 2001, Vol 73, Iss 22, pp 5525-5531.

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Copyright © 2001 Institute for Scientific Information

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Chemistry 960, Spring 2002 - Physical Chemistry Seminar

Prof. James C. Weisshaar, Monday and Wednesday, probably 1:20-2:10 pm., Probably Room 8335 Chemistry, 2 Credits. While a seminar is often an excellent way to get a snapshot of a research area outside one's own field, understanding seminars can be challenging for all of us. This two-credit course is a version of the Physical Chemistry Seminar designed for first- and second-year graduate students with two goals in mind. First, we will demystify the pchem seminars themselves. Second, we will provide hands-on, practical experience in the design and presentation of seminars, something every scientist must learn to do. We will meet twice a week during most of the weeks of the semester. In the Monday meeting, we will discuss the background of the seminar topic to be presented on Tuesday by an outside speaker. This will include theoretical and experimental methods, the context of the science, and why the work is interesting and new. You will receive one or two papers written by the speaker the week before; these will provide the primary context of the discussion on Monday. On Wednesday, we will have a follow-up meeting to discuss the primary points of the seminar, to clarify difficult points, and to discuss what was strong and what was weaker in the presentation. Student presentations will also occur on Wednesdays. Each person taking the course will be responsible for leading the Monday and Wednesday discussions for one of the seminars in collaboration with the instructor. In addition, each participant will present one 30-minute presentation to the class on the scientific topic of his choice. The quality of the presentations and of participation in the general discussion will determine course grades. Students who took Chem 960 for two credits last Spring are welcome to take it for credit one more time. Students who wish to sit in on the discussion are welcome also. For further information, please contact Jim Weisshaar at: e-mail: weisshaar@chem.wisc.edu, or phone: 262-0266.

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NIH-sponsored Biotechnology Training Program

The Biotechnology Training Program is soliciting nominations of matriculated students for treineeships on the / (BTP). They are interested in students of strong academic caliber who have expressed a particular interest in cross-disciplinary training. The BTP steering committee reviews the applications and awards positions on the training grant in January. Seven awards will be available to be awarded before June 30, 2002. The success of the BTP is dependent on attracting trainees from the biological, physical and computational sciences. Therefore, we are encouraging trainees in Ph.D. programs from each of these general areas to apply for support. Only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible for funding on this pre-doctoral training grant, however, non-citizens with interests that coincide with this program are welcome to take part in the program as non-NIH funded participants. Students awarded traineeships in this current competition are typically first or second year graduate students. Domestic students who desire this type of cross-disciplinary training but are not in need of Biotechnology Training Program funding are also welcome to participate in the program. Students and faculty who want additional information about the program and its requirements are encouraged to contact the program office or visit our website at http://www.bact.wisc.edu/Biotech/BTPindex. The deadline for submitting nominations is January 4, 2002. Nominations forms may be obtained from the Chemistry Graduate Office, Room 1120.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of South Carolina announces its 2002 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program in Nanoscience. The REU Program in Nanoscience provides opportunities for undergraduate students to be directly involved in the research of nanoscience, focusing on the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials. Nanoscale materials with superior and novel properties will lead the technology races of the 21st century and many members of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have active research interests in this area, ranging from the construction of nanowires to organic logic circuits to biocatalysts to sensor development. Information regarding the 2002 REU Program in Nanoscience at the University of South Carolina is available at: http://www.nano.sc.edu/reu. I encourage you to visit our web site and to inform your students of the research experience available to them. If you have any questions, please contact me at (803) 777-3628 or email murphy@mail.chem.sc.edu or contact: Catherine J. Murphy, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC 29208.


FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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Rockford College, a private, non-denominational, liberal-arts college in Rockford, Illinois, is seeking a candidate for a one-year, leave-of-absence replacement, starting August 2002. The position is in organic chemistry, with additional duties in the general chemistry program and, perhaps, undergraduate research projects. In the event this would open up to a tenure-track position, starting Fall 2003, the Department would then do a formal search, and the candidate would naturally be in an excellent position for that search. We encourage, especially, candidates who seek a career in teaching at a four-year, undergraduate institution. Such a position asks that the teacher be an active part of the college community, be willing to explore teaching opportunities outside his or her immediate field of expertise, and be an integral part of an active, dedicated chemistry department. The Chemistry Department at Rockford College has four full-time faculty members. We offer a B.A. and an ACS-accredited B.S. degree in chemistry and a B.S. degree in biochemistry. We graduate 4-6 majors a year in chemistry/biochemistry. We have a nice array of equipment, including an FT-IR and FT-NMR (Anasazi adaption to our 60 MHz instrument), a photolysis reaction unit, and various GC's, HPLC, and a GC-MS, which we are currently assembling. Each faculty member also has a personal research lab, apart from the general lab areas. The department also has a part-time lab curator and a well-endowed equipment fund for use by the department. Our college web site is at http://www.rockford.edu. Qualified, interested candidates should forward a curriculum vitae with a list of three references, either by email or by normal mail to: Dr. Fred Hadley, Department of Chemistry, Rockford College, 5050 E. State Street, Rockford, IL 61108, Email: Fred_Hadley@rockford.edu, Phone: (815) 226- 4170, FAX: (815) 394-5166.

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Nebraska Wesleyan University invites applications for a tenure-track position in Physical Chemistry beginning Fall 2002. Ph.D. in chemistry is required; postdoctoral experience is desirable. Candidates must show strong commitment to teaching and research with undergraduates. Responsibilities include physical chemistry, introductory chemistry and general education courses. Nebraska Wesleyan is an undergraduate liberal arts institution with an enrollment of 1700, ranked nationally for the strength of its academic programs and excellence in teaching. The Chemistry Department is ACS approved. Send: CV, statement of teaching philosophy, outline of research interests, graduate and undergraduate transcripts and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. David Treichel, Nebraska Wesleyan University, 5000 St. Paul Ave., Lincoln, NE 68504-2794. Review of applications will begin January 2, 2002, and will continue until the position is filled.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AND/OR JOBS

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None for this Newsletter

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON JANUARY 7th, 2002.