Chemistry Newsletter - 11/03/2008

 


University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter



XXXII - No. 35 November 3rd, 2008

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2008 Dates of Finance/Department Meetings in November and December

 

Nov. 4: Finance Committee

Nov. 11: NO MEETING

Nov. 18: Department Meeting

Nov. 25: Finance Committee

Dec. 2: Finance Committee

Dec. 9: NO MEETING

Dec. 16: Department Meeting

Dec. 23: Finance Committee, if necessary

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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, November 4th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Frank Keutsch, UW-Madison. “Analysis of the Processes Controlling Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Glyoxal by Chamber, Laboratory and Field Studies”

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Thursday, November 6th, 2008 - Theoretical Chemistry Seminar, 1:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor YiQin Gao, Texas A & M University. “Integrated Tempering Sampling and Studies on the Water/air Interface”

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Thursday, November 6th, 2008 - Materials Science Seminar, 4:00 p.m., Room 2535 Engineering Hall. Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky. “From Nano to Macro - Examples from studies of nanostructured materials for automotive applications”

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Friday, November 7th, 2008 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Biddy Martin, Chancellor, UW-Madison. A Short Q&A Session, from 4:00 - 4:30 p.m., followed by a Reception in the Atrium.

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Friday, November 7th, 2008 - EC&T Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room 102 Water Science & Engineering Laboratory, 660 North Park Street. David Snyder, EC&T. “Understanding the Contribution of Point Sources to Atmospheric Metals using Single-Particle Mass Spectroscopy”

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Monday, November 10th, 2008 - Theoretical Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor Shi-Jie Chen, University of Missouri. “A New Computational Approach for RNA Folding Kinetics with Applications to the Mechanical Folding of RNA Hairpins”

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Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Patricia Clark, University of Notre Dame. “Using the Free Energy of Folding to Transport Proteins Across a Membrane”

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Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Tom Hoye, University of Minnesota.

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Thursday, November 13th, 2008 - Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy Public Lecture, 7:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. UW-Madison Vilas Research Professor of Philosophy Elliot Sober. “Darwinism and intelligent Design”

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Thursday, November 13th, 2008 - Theoretical Chemistry Institute Seminar, 1:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor John F. Stanton, University of Texas at Austin. “The Molecule That Doesn't Obey the Rules”

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Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Arthur L. Utz, Tufts University. “Bond-Selective Control of a Heterogeneously Catalyzed Reaction”

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Friday, November 21st, 2008 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor John Moore, UW-Madison. “The Chemical Education Digital Library: A New Online Resource for Teachers and Students”

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Tuesday, November 25th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Gerhard Hummer, NIDDK. “Molecules Under Tension: Theory of Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy”

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Monday, December 1st, 2008 - Theoretical Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor Wei Yang, Florida State University. “Orthogonal Space Random Walk: A Possible Avenue Leading Biomolecular Simulation to the Quantitative Regime”

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Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David Manolopolus, University of Oxford. “Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics”

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Tuesday, January 27th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ilan Benjamin, University of California. “Relaxation and Reactions at Water Surfaces”

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Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Bern Kohler, Ohio State University.

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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor William L. Hase, Texas Tech University. “Dynamics and Kinetics of Heat Transfer at Nano-Scale Interfaces”

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Friday, February 13th, 2009 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Tim Donohue, Director of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Center, UW-Madison, Department of Bacteriology.

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Tuesday, February 17th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Troy Van Voorhis, MIT. “Exploring Electron Transfer: From Simple Photochemistry to Energy Conversion”

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Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kristie Boering, University of California.

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Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Austen Angell, Arizona State University. “The Art and Science of Supercooling:” “Ideal Glassformers” vs “Ideal Glasses”

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Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Doug Weibel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry.

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Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Paul Hergenrother, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sunney Xie, Harvard.

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Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Andrew Phillips, University of Colorado-Boulder.

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Friday, April 3rd, 2009 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Lawrence Dahl, UW-Madison.

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Monday, April 6th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 1:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 7th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel T. Hess, University of Maine.

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Friday, April 17th, 2009 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dr. Helmut Schwartz, Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Chemie, and President, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

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Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

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Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

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Thursday, April 23rd, 2009 - Organic Chemistry - Abbott Lectures, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dave Evans, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University.

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Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. William Roush, Scripps.

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Tuesday, May 5th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry building. Professor Lewis Kay, University of Toronto.

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Tuesday May 5th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

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Wednesday, May 6 th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

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Institutes for Discovery Designed for Inspiration

Wisconsin State Journal Article - By DEBORAH ZIFF, 608-252-6234, October 31, 2008.

Sitting in the Dane County Regional Airport on his way to Santa Fe, New Mexico, little did UW-Madison chemistry professor Lloyd Smith know he was about to have an encounter that would significantly change the course of his life. Smith had met biomolecular chemistry professor James Dahlberg once or twice before but did not know him well. But stuck together in the confines of the airport waiting room on their way to the same conference, the two struck up a conversation about their work. Smith had a fledgling company that needed new life and Dahlberg had recently-patented technology that he wanted to commercialize.

The chance encounter more than 15 years ago sparked Third Wave Technologies, a business venture that was sold this year for $580 million. Scientists and researchers say it is frequently in these casual or unexpected moments that inspiration strikes. The question of how best to design a building that would facilitate such eureka moments was foremost in the minds of the creators of the new Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, who didn't want a traditional office building, but a space that would give scientists a nudge toward greatness.

The Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, currently a yawning hole at the intersection of Campus Drive and University Avenue, is a $150 million research complex of unprecedented scope in the state of Wisconsin. The building, set to open in 2010, consists of twin institutes: the publicly funded Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and the private Morgridge Institute for Research. Though the researchers who will work in the building have not yet been chosen, the goal is to assemble scientists from different backgrounds who will collaborate to make breakthroughs in human health and welfare.

“Madison's really good at interdisciplinary research. It's done all over campus,” said Carl Gulbrandsen, managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation and chair of the Morgridge Institute for Research Board. “But the facilities on this campus generally have not been built for that purpose. They've been built for a department. Then they go and do interdisciplinary work in the facilities and they kind of jury-rig them to do what they want.” The architects said they looked to scientists for input on this project, more so than any other building in the history of campus, said George Austin, project manager.

What they found was that scientists say their best ideas happen over a cup of coffee, a pint of beer or in passing on the sidewalk. “It's really when they're outside of their normal routines that they'll jog their minds to go in new directions,” said Laura Heisler, program developer for the Morgridge Institute, the private portion of the Institutes. The features of the building were designed to promote those sorts of run-ins: a way of manufacturing what would only occur by chance under normal circumstances.

The building will only have three research floors, for instance, with the idea that if it was taller it would be less likely for scientists to bump into one another. There will be an atrium in the center of the building so that people can see from one floor to the next. Intentionally, there are no long hallways where a scientist could scurry to his or her lab without surfacing in a public space. A “town center” on the first floor will be a public space and will feature a restaurant, soda fountain and symposium space, where there will be foot traffic by scientists as well as members of the public. Smith said he didn't think the collaboration with Dahlberg would have happened had they not happened to meet each other at the airport. “My normal life path doesn't cross his,” Smith said. “This is a really big university.

That particular venueput us in that situation.” Smith said it's important to feel comfortable around other scientists, especially when working across disciplines where a researcher may be out of his or her field of expertise. Seeing people frequently in a building helps to develop that comfort level. “If you don't have those collisions with people and the opportunity to interact in an informal way, those things just don't happen,” he said.

Food science professor Michael Pariza works in the microbial science building, which opened last year, and has some similar architectural elements to WID, like open hallways and neighborhoods of researchers. “When you walk into a central corridor and you look down and see someone on the floor below or above, you do remember things you probably wouldn't otherwise remember,” he said. But, he said, “I don't necessarily see the light bulb moment happening because you're in a great building.”

Perhaps more important is that the work of researchers fit together. In his case, one of Pariza's aha! moments came as he walked along the Lakeshore Path nearly 20 years ago, mulling over a research question. Poultry science professor Mark Cook ran past and stopped to say hello. They began chatting about Pariza's research problem: he knew a fatty acid called conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was having an effect on the immune system, but didn't know how. Cook, who was studying the influence of nutrition on the immune response in animals, was just the man Pariza needed. That blossomed into a partnership and subsequent discoveries, yielding dozens of patents in dietary supplements, treatment for autoimmune diseases and more. “At the end of the day it's personal chemistry,” Pariza said. “You really have to both be bringing something independent to it to kind of complete the picture.”

Copyright ©2008, Capital Newspapers.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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None For This Newsletter

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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None For This Newsletter

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS

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Postdoctoral Position in Nano-manufacturing, Argonne National Laboratory. The Energy System Disivion at Argonne National Laboratory has an immediate opening for a Postdoctoral Fellow position to develop nanoscale electrodeposition technologies. We are interested in an electrochemical engineer or applied electrochemist with research experience in the area of application of electrochemistry to surface coatings. Candidate will be expected to work independently and have strong hands-on skill for conducting experiments. Experience with techniques for characterization of material and surface layers is a strong plus in this position. Excellent communication in oral and written communication is essential. Specific areas of research include, but are not limited to:

1. Electrochemical engineering or applied electrochemistry of thin-film layers and coatings.

2. Instrumentation including SEMs, STMs and other techniques for determining the composition sand morphology of thin layers and coatings.

3. Non-aqueous electrolytes, e.g., ionic liquids and molten salts.

Interested candidates should send a detailed CV, along with a list of publications, and the names and addresses of three references to: YuPo J. Lin, yplin@anl.gov and Seth W. Snyder, seth@anl.gov. Information about Argonne is available at the web site: http://www.anl.gov. Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

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NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON NOVEMBER 10th, 2008.