Chemistry Newsletter - 09/19/2205

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter


XXIX - No. 28 September 19th, 2005

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Helen Blackwell Named as One of the Top 35 Innovators Under 35 Years of Age

Helen Blackwell has been named by Technology Review Magazine, a publication of MIT, as one of the top 35 innovators under 35 years of age. Helen was honored for her work in studying the way bacteria chemically communicate with each other to form "biofilms," which are a main cause of infection. Congratulations Helen!

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Analytical and Materials softball team won the first inter-divisional softball tournament

I wanted to report that the Analytical and Materials softball team won the first inter-divisional softball tournament at the Snout Out this weekend and took home the Snout Out softball trophy. Organic came in second, P.Chem. in third, and Inorganic in fourth place. Thanks, Heidi Behrens.

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Analytical, Materials, and Inorganic Faculty Short Talk Series

The analytical, materials, and inorganic faculty will be giving a series of short talks on Mondays at 5:45-7:30 PM (Rm 8335) describing their research interests. There will be three 20-minute talks and an informal supper each evening. Students from all areas are welcome to attend.

 

5:45

6:10

7:00

September 26

Professor Song Jin

Professor Thomas Brunold

Professor Scott Sanders

October 3

Professor Nita Sahai

Professor Jim Weisshaar

Professor Clark Landis

October 10

Professor John Moore

Professor John Wright

Professor Judith Burstyn

October 17

Professor David Schwartz

Professor Lloyd Smith

Professor Larry Dahl

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Introductory Research Talks in Physical Chemistry

Thursdays 5:45-7:45 pm Room 8335

For entering graduate students interested in physical chemistry, there will be a series of short talks by faculty members describing their research interests. These will be held at 5:45 p.m. on Thursdays during the first weeks of the semester. There will be one half-hour talk followed by an informal supper and then two more talks.

Since these talks are brief, students should follow up by contacting individual faculty members in whose research they are interested. Each student should interview at least three faculty members during the fall semester concerning research opportunities.

These talks are a means of finding research opportunities and of obtaining a broad overview of physical chemistry research in the Department. Students expecting to major in physical chemistry should make every effort to attend all of these talks.

 

Schedule for Introductory Research Talks

 

5:45

6:45

7:15

Sept. 22

Nita Sahai

Frank Keutsch

Silvia Cavagnero

Sept. 29

Jim Weisshaar

John Wright

Gil Nathanson

Oct. 6

Fleming Crim

Bob McMahon

Jim Skinner

Oct. 13

Ned Sibert

Bob Hamers

Joshua Coon

Oct. 20

Qiang Cui

Song Jin

Arun Yethiraj

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department/Executive Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 9341 Chemistry

 

10/11/05

11/08/05

12/13/05

2/14/06

3/21/06

4/11/06

5/9/06

Finance Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 1130

 

9/20/05

10/4/05

10/18/05

11/1/05

11/15/05

12/6/05

12/20/05

1/17/06

2/7/06

2/21/06

3/7/06

3/28/06

4/4/06

4/18/06

 

5/2/06

 

5/16/06

 

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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, September 20th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Frank Keutsch, UW-Madison. “Insights into Convective Transport of Water using Isotopic Data from the AVE_WIIF Campaign Obtained with the Airborne Harvard Water Isotope ICOS Instrument”

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Tuesday, September 20th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Masahiro Murakami, Kyoto University. “Contrasteric Torque Control by Metal-Orbital Interactions”

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Thursday, September 22nd, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Michelle V. Buchanan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. “A High Throughput Approach for the Identification of Protein Complexes”

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Friday, September 23rd, 2005 - Lincoln Seminar, 1:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Grant Geske, UW-Madison, Blackwell Group. “Disrupting Dialog: Inhibition of Bacterial Cell-Cell Communication”

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Monday, September 26th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Adam Tomasik, Graduate Student, West Group.

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Tuesday, September 27th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Huey W. Huang, Rice University. “Membrane Active Peptides Induce Structural Changes in Lipid Bilayers”

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Tuesday, September 27th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Karen Wooley, Washington University in Saint Louis. “Well defined nanostructured materials: Discrete nanoobjects and nanoscopically resolved crosslinked networks”

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Wednesday, September 28th, 2005 - Novartis Lectures, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dieter Seebach, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. “Structures and Biological Properties of Peptides Consisting of Homologated Proteinogenic Amino Acids”

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Thursday, September 29th, 2005 - Novartis Lectures, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dieter Seebach, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. “Organic Synthesis = Synthetic Engineering?”

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Thursday, September 29th, 2005 - Materials Chemistry Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Paul Voyles, Materials Science and Engineering Department, UW-Madison. “Towards the Ultimate Analysis with TEM and STEM”

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Friday, September 30th, 2005 - Chemistry Departmental Colloquium, 3:45 p. m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Robert L. Wolke, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh. “Chemical Abuse in the Kitchen”

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Monday, October 3rd, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Jie Liang, University of Illinois at Chicago. “Geometric patterns and evolution of protein local structures: Predicting protein function and designing peptide modulators for protein-protein interactions”

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Tuesday, October 4th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Richard A. Loomis, Washington University in St. Louis. “The Interactions of Rare Gas Atoms with Dihalogen Molecules: Finding the Surprise Ending of an Old Story “

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Tuesday, October 4th, 2005 - Organic - McElvain Industrial Speaker, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Jothan Coe, Pfizer.

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Wednesday, October 5th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kenneth Caulton, Indiana University.

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Thursday, October 6th, 2005 - Materials Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Frank DiSalvo, Cornell University.

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Thursday, October 6th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Nicola Pohl, Iowa State University.

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Friday, October 7th, 2005 - Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy Seminar, 8:00 p.m., Morphy Recital Hall, Mosse Humanities Building. Lise Keiter-Bortzman. “Music by Women Composers from 1760 to 1977"

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Monday, October 10th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Robert Eisenberg, Rush University. “Ion Channels, Living Transistors”

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Monday, October 10th, 2005 - Hirschfelder Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Henry F. Schaefer, University of Georgia. “The Third Age of Quantum Chemistry”

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Tuesday, October 11th, 2005 - Hirschfelder Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Henry F. Schaefer, University of Georgia. “Thermochemistry and Spectroscopy of Soot Formation Intermediates”

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Wednesday, October 12th, 2005 - Hirschfelder Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Henry F. Schaefer, University of Georgia. “Lesions in DNA Subunits: Foundational Studies of Structures and Energetics”

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Thursday, October 13th, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Frank Keutsch, Department of Chemistry, UW-Madison. “Atmospheric field measurements with new spectroscopic techniques: Climate change and tropospheric chemistry”

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Thursday, October 13th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Laura Wysocki, Burke Group.

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Tuesday, October 18th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David N. Beratan, Duke University. “Designing Molecules by Optimizing Potentials”

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Tuesday, October 18th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Adam J. Matzger, University of Michigan.

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Wednesday, October 19th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Myong Lee, Yonsei University.

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Thursday, October 20th, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor John Wright, Department of Chemistry, UW-Madison. “Mixed Frequency/Time Domain Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy- The Optical Analogue to Multidimensional Heteronuclear NMR Methods”

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Thursday, October 20th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jane Coughlin, Shen Group.

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Friday, October 21st, 2005 - Chemistry Departmental Colloquium, 3:30 p. m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Elaine A. Cohen Hubal from the EPA.

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Monday, October 24th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Robert T. Hembre, Eastman Kodak Chemical Company.

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Monday, October 24th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Stephen Levene, University of Texas at Dallas. “Topology in Molecular Biology: From DNA Mechanics to Enzymology”

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Tuesday, October 25th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor D. James Donaldson, University of Toronto. “Whad’Ya Know? A Physical Chemist’s Approach to the Atmosphere”

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Tuesday, October 25th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sergey Kozmin, University of Chicago. “Chemical Synthesis: From New Reactivity to Molecular Complexity and Cell Regulatory Function”

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Wednesday, October 26th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Matthew Christianson, Graduate Student, Landis Group.

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Thursday, October 27th, 2005 - Materials Chemistry Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Lars Samuelson, Lund University, Sweden. “Materials and device physics aspects of semiconductor nanowires”

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Thursday, October 27th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Victoria Wilde, Burke Group.

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Monday, October 31th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Charles Burant, University of Michigan. “Adipocyte Development, Nutrient Sensing and Mutations in AGPAT2”

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Tuesday, November 1st, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Richard M. Stratt, Brown University. “Relaxation a Little Too Far From Equilibrium”

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Tuesday, November 1st, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Rustem F. Ismagilov, The University of Chicago. “Synthesizing and Understanding Complex Reaction Networks”

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Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Laurie Grove, Graduate Student, Brunold Group.

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Thursday, November 3rd, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Lloyd D. Fricker, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

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Thursday, November 3rd, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kris Kolonko, Reich Group.

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Monday, November 7th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Nathan Baker, Washington University.

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Tuesday, November 8th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ronald G. Larson, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. “DNA and Microfluidics”

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Wednesday, November 9th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Christopher Scarborough, Graduate Student, Stahl Group.

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Thursday, November 10th, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Lara Spencer, UW-Madison Graduate Student.

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Thursday, November 10th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Caroline Pharr, McMahon Group.

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Monday, November 14th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. F. Anne Walker, University of Arizona.

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Monday, November 14th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Charles Brooks, Scripps Research Institute. “General Features and Methanisms of Functionally Relevant Large-Scale Reorganization of Molecular Machines”

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Tuesday, November 15th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Charles L. Brooks III, Scripps Research Institute. “Protein Folding Free Energy Landscapes - Insights Into Mechanism, Kinetics and Function From Molecular Simulations”

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Thursday, November 17th, 2005 - Materials Chemistry Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. James E. Butler, Naval Research Laboratory. “Diamond Diversity”

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Thursday, November 17th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jonathan Fast, Mecozzi Group.

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Friday, November 18th, 2005 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p. m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. James E. Butler, Naval Research Laboratory. “Diamond Perfected?”

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Monday, November 21st, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Boris Kholodenko, Thomas Jefferson University. “Systems Biology of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling: Can We Navigate Through Molecular Jungles?”

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Wednesday, November 23rd, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Bhavesh Gandhi, Graduate Student, Burstyn Group.

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Monday, November 28th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. John Yin, UW Madison. “Dynamics of Virus Growth and Spread - A Systems Biology Approach”

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Tuesday, November 29th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Daesung Lee, UW-Madison.

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Thursday, December 1st, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Matthew Dodge, Burke Group.

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Thursday, December 1st, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Audrey Gasch, UW-Madison, Genetics.

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Monday, December 5th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. Yun-Xing Wang, National Cancer Institute. “Using NMR to Answer Fundamental Biological Questions”

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Tuesday, December 6th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Shana O. Kelly, Boston College.

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Wednesday, December 7th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. James O’Donnell, Graduate Student, Landis Group.

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Thursday, December 8th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. SooHyuk Choi, Gellman Group.

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Thursday, December 8th, 2005 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Robert Blick, UW-Madison, Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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Monday, December 12th, 2005 - Biochemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry, 420 Henry Mall, UW-Madison. George Rose, Johns Hopkins University. “Proteins: The Unfolding Story”

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Tuesday, December 13th, 2005 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Edward J. Kramer, University of California, Santa Barbara. “Phase Transitions in Flatland: Order, Disorder and Defects in Block Copolymer Monolayers and Multilayers”

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Wednesday, December 14th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jocelyn Pinkert, Graduate Student, Burstyn Group.

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Tuesday, January 17th, 2006 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Timothy Zwier, Purdue University. “Laser Probes of the Potential Energy Surfaces of Flexible Molecules and Water-containing Complexes”

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Thursday, January 19th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Seyed Seradj, Burke Group.

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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David M. Leitner, University of Nevada, Reno.

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Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Phil S. Baran, The Scripps Research Institute. “The Catalytic Cycle of Discovery in Total Synthesis”

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Thursday, January 26th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Brian Smith, Denu Group.

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Tuesday, January 31st, 2006 - Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Richard J. Saykally, University of California, Berkeley.

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Tuesday, February 1st, 2006 - Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 2:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Richard J. Saykally, University of California, Berkeley.

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Thursday, February 2nd, 2006 - McElvain Lecture, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor John Yates, Scripps Research Institute.

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Thursday, February 2nd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Karen Schmidt, Mecozzi Group.

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Tuesday, February 7th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Marcus Weck, Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Tuesday, February 7th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Venkat Ganesan, University of Texas at Austin. “Dynamical Phenomena in Multicomponent Polymers”

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Thursday, February 9th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Andrew Razgulin, Mecozzi Group.

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Tuesday, February 14th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Hanna Reisler, University of Southern California.

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Thursday, February 16th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Adam Garske, Denu Group.

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Monday, February 20th, 2006 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Melanie Sanford, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

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Tuesday, February 21st, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ji-Xin Cheng, Purdue University.

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Thursday, February 23rd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Sarah Jewell, Blackwell Group.

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Tuesday, February 28th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Roger E. Miller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Chemistry on the Brink: Photo-induced Reaction Dynamics of Entrance Channel Complexes”

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Thursday, March 2nd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Luke Lavis, Raines Group.

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Tuesday, March 7th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Arieh Warshel, University of Southern California. “Computer Simulations of Enzymatic Reactions: Finding out What are the Catalytic Principles that Really Work?”

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Tuesday, March 7th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christian E. Schafmeister, University of Pittsburgh.

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Thursday, March 9th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Sangho Park, Lee Group.

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Monday, March 20th, 2006 - Ferry Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christopher M. Dobson, Cambridge University, UK.

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Tuesday, March 21st, 2006 - Ferry Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christopher M. Dobson, Cambridge University, UK.

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Tuesday, March 21st, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David M. Walba, University of Colorado. “High Throughput Measurement of ee Using Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals”

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Thursday, March 23rd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jamie Ellis, Cavagnero Group.

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Wednesday Thru Friday, March 29th - 31st, 2006 - Meloche Lectures, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Stephen Lippard, MIT.

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Thursday, March 30th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Bin Sun, Lynn Group.

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Monday, April 3rd, 2006 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Patrick Holland, University of Rochester.

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark A. Johnson, Yale University.

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor D. Tyler McQuade, Cornell University. “Microreactors, Encapsulated Catalysts, and Mechanisms: New Tools and Techniques for Polymer and Small Molecule Synthesis”

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Thursday, April 6th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kevin Schultz, Nelsen Group.

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Tuesday, April 11th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sanat Kumar, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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Tuesday, April 11th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dan O’Leary, Poona College. “Deuterium and Tritium NMR Equilibrium Isotope Effects Involving OH/OH and CH/N Hydrogen Bonds: Stereochemical Applications”

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Wednesday, April 12th, 2006 - Merck Lectures, a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Steven Ley, University of Cambridge, UK.

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Thursday, April 13th, 2006 - Merck Lectures, a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Steven Ley, University of Cambridge, UK.

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Tuesday, April 18th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor H. Jane Dyson, The Scripps Research Institute. “New Insights from NMR into Unfolded Proteins and the Protein Folding Process”

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Thursday, April 18th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Virginia W. Cornish, Columbia University. “Co-Opting Nature's Machineries for Chemical Discovery”

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Thursday, April 20th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jennifer O’Neill, Blackwell Group.

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Tuesday, April 25th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Michael J. Saxton, University of California at Davis.

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Thursday, April25th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Matt Sigman, University of Utah.

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Thursday, April 27th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jon Tunge, University of Kansas.

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Tuesday, May 2nd, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kenneth Jordan, University of Pittsburgh. “Electron and Proton Localization in Water Clusters”

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Tuesday, May 2nd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Peter Stang, University of Utah. “Nanoscale Molecular Architecture: Design and Self-Assembly of Metallocyclic Polygons and Polyhedra via Coordination”

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Thursday, May 4th, 2006 - McElvain Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Suzanne Walker, Harvard University.

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Thursday, May 11th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jeff Johnston, Indiana University.

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Physical Chemistry Student Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://www.chem.wisc.edu/physical/Home.html.

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Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program, Washington, D.C.

This Graduate Fellowship Program of the National Academies consisting of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council is designed to engage graduate and postdoctoral students in science and technology policy and to familiarize them with the interactions among science, technology, and government. As a result, students in the fields of science, engineering, medicine, veterinary medicine, business, and law develop essential skills different from those attained in academia, which will help them make the transition from being a graduate student to a professional.

We are pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2006 sessions. The program will comprise three 10-week sessions:

Winter: January 9-March 17 - Summer: June 5-August 11 - Fall: September 11-November 17.

To apply, candidates should submit an application and request that a mentor/adviser fill out a reference form. Both forms are available on the Web at: http://national-academies.org/policyfellows. The deadline for receipt of application material is November 1 for the winter program, March 1 for the summer program, and June 1 for the fall program. Candidates may apply to all three programs concurrently. Additional details about the program and a link to join the mailing list are available on the Web site. Questions should be directed to: policyfellows@nas.edu.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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Announcement No: E20050135. Open: 09/06/05 Close: 10/06/05. This Is a Temporary Position Not to Exceed 13 Months. Appointment May Be Extended up to Two Additional Years for a Total of Three Years. Position Vacant: Program Manager (Biotechnology), Ad-340-4. Salary Ranges From $88,369 - $137,713 per Annum. Promotion Potential: Program Manager. (Biotechnology), Ad-340-4. Directorate for Engineering, Office of Industrial Innovation, Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, Arlington, VA. This position is included in the Bargaining Unit and will be filled in accordance with the merit staffing provisions of the Collective Bargaining Agreement, Article VIII. Appointment to this position will be made under the Excepted Authority of the NSF Act. Candidates who do not have civil service status or reinstatement eligibility will not obtain civil service status if selected. Candidates currently in the competitive civil service will be required to waive competitive civil service rights if selected. Usual civil service benefits (retirement, health benefits, life insurance) are applicable for appointments of more than one year. Disabled veterans with 30% service- connected disabilities as well as other applicants with severe disabilities will be considered without regard to the closing date if applications are received prior to final selection. The incumbent of this position will: Plan and administer the relevant program within the framework of legislation, agency policies, missions, objectives and resources and serves as spokesperson of the program and with the scientific, engineering, and business community; Implement the proposal review and evaluation process for the relevant program (e.g., review of proposals; selection of reviewers; management of program; and allocation of budget); Implement new or revised policies, and develop technical, fiscal, and administrative approaches to improve the activities and management of the program; Manage and monitor grants and interagency agreements to ensure fulfillment of commitments to/and by NSF; Work with program staff NSF-wide especially within the Directorate for Engineering, the Directorate of Biological Sciences, the Directorate of Computer Information Science and Engineering, the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences and the Directorate for GeoSciences to apprise them to the requirements of SBIR and sensitize them to the requirements of the small business community; Design, develop, manage, coordinate, and implement small business solicitations, conferences, publications, reports and research and study projects; Develop and present clear and concise explanations and interpretations of NSF policies and research program initiatives for small businesses, the academic community, large industrial firms, the investment community, state and local governments, and other federal agencies; Serve as the NSF's representative on permanent or ad hoc committees. Applicants must have a Ph.D., or equivalent experience, in biology, biosciences, bioengineering, biochemical, biomedical engineering or a closely related field, and six years of successful research experience, research administration, and/or managerial experience in research, design and development of biotechnology products, devices, processes or services. Specific experience in the commercialization of innovative biotechnology products or services, preferably in a small business setting, is sought. You may apply for this position with the Optional Application for Federal Employment (OF-612), the older Application for Federal Employment (SF-171), a resume, or other application format of your choice. Status candidates must also submit a Notification of Personnel Action (SF750), showing competitive status, and current Performance Appraisal. You must specify the job announcement number, and titles and grade(s) of the job for which you are applying. You should also include the following information: your country of citizenship; Your social security number; Information about your education, including (1) high school graduation date and (2) college/university information - your major, and type and year of degree(s). If no degree, show total credits earned and indicate whether semester or quarter hours; Information about all your work experience related to this job, including job titles, duties and accomplishments, employer's name, number of hours worked per week, starting and ending dates (month and year), and annual salary. If you held various positions with the same employer, describe each separately. If you have Federal civilian experience, indicate the highest grade held, the job series, and dates held. The brochure Applying for a Federal Job provides information on the Federal job application process; it is available by calling the number listed below. If your application does not provide all the information requested in the vacancy announcement, you may lose consideration for this job. Applications may be submitted via email to: mloyd@nsf.gov or submit application material to: the National Science Foundation, Division of Human Resource Management, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Room 315, Arlington, VA 22230. Attn: Announcement E20050135. Inquiries of a technical nature regarding this position may be directed to: Dr. Kesh Narayanan, Office of Industrial Innovation at (703) 292-8330. For additional information call HR Representative Myra Loyd on (703) 292-4363.


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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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Lamar University, a member of the Texas State University System, located in Beaumont, Texas, invites applications and nominations for an anticipated tenured or tenure-track faculty position in Analytical or Forensic Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Physics beginning Fall 2006. With a recently completed $5.5 million dollar renovation to our facilities, we are seeking a motivated teacher and researcher with interests in analytical and/or forensic science. Applications from chemists with an earned doctoral degree will be considered. Rank and tenure are commensurate with experience. Candidates are expected to have a strong potential for creative and fundamental research and a commitment to education at all levels. Applicants should submit a complete vitae, a statement of teaching interests and experience, research plans (not to exceed five pages & including undergraduates), and three letters of recommendation to: Professor J. W. Rabalais, c/o Human Resources, Lamar University, P. O. Box 11127, Beaumont, TX 77710-1127. The review of applications will begin on Nov. 21, 2005 and continue until the position is filled.

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The Department of Chemistry at Wellesley College invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in biochemistry at the rank of first-level assistant professor beginning in September 2006. We are seeking candidates who are committed to excellence in both teaching and research in a liberal arts environment. Candidates will be expected to teach courses at all levels of our curriculum and should have plans for an active research program that involves undergraduates. While the position is open to any field of biochemistry, we are especially interested in candidates whose work includes analytical, inorganic or physical aspects of the field. A Ph.D. is required and postdoctoral experience is desirable. Applications, including a cover letter, a statement of teaching experience, interests and philosophy, a statement of research interests, a curriculum vitae and three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with your academic background, should be sent, in either Word or pdf format, to: biochemsearch@wellesley.edu. In addition, copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts should be sent to: Prof. William F. Coleman, Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley MA 02481.

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Asst/Assoc/Full Professor -- All Areas of Chemistry Except Physical. The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department of Auburn University invites applications for two tenure track positions – one in analytical and one in any area of chemistry and biochemistry except physical. Duties include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and developing a vigorous, externally funded research program. A Ph.D. in the area of specialization and at least one year of postdoctoral experience are required. The candidates selected for these positions, which begin in August 2006, must meet eligibility requirements to work in the United States on date appointment is scheduled to begin and must be able to communicate in English. Applicants should submit curriculum vitae, statements of research plans and teaching philosophy and have three letters of reference sent to: Chemistry Search Committee, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, AL 36849-5312. Review of applications will begin October 8,2005 and will continue until the positions are filled.

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Organic Chemist. The Hope College Department of Chemistry invites applications for a tenure track position in organic chemistry at either the Assistant or Associate Professor level to begin Fall 2006. The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in organic chemistry, and applicants with postdoctoral experience will be given preference. Primary teaching responsibilities include organic chemistry with laboratory and advanced organic topics. The development of a strong, externally funded, experimental organic research program involving undergraduate students is expected. Start-up funds will be provided. The Chemistry Department: http://www.hope.edu/academic/chemistry/ is a national leader in undergraduate research and moved into a new facility in 2003. Hope College is a co-educational, liberal arts college affiliated with the Reformed Church in America. Applicants should arrange to have a curriculum vitae, transcripts, descriptions of research plans, a statement of teaching philosophy and competencies, and three letters of recommendation sent to: Dr. Michael Seymour, Chairperson, Chemistry Search Committee, Hope College, 35 East 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423. Review of applications will begin October 19th.

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Organic Chemist Position, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. California State University, Long Beach. Assistant/Associate Professor (considered for exceptionally experienced candidate), REC # 037. Effective date: Aug 21, 2006. Ph.D. in organic chemistry or closely related area, a record of published research, potential for developing and sustaining an independent externally-funded research program involving undergraduate and graduate students leading to peer-reviewed publications, potential for effective teaching in organic chemistry, and the ability to communicate effectively with a culturally and ethnically diverse campus community. At least two years of post-doctoral research experience, prior successful teaching at the post-secondary level. Teach undergraduate lecture and laboratory courses in organic and general chemistry and graduate level courses in organic chemistry, supervise undergraduate and graduate student research, develop and sustain an independent and externally funded research program involving undergraduate and graduate students leading to publication (Research start-up funds are available.), participate in activities serving the department, university, and community. The normal workload of a full-time faculty member consists of 15 units of direct and indirect instructional activity each academic semester as follows: Twelve (12) units of direct instructional assignment, including classroom and laboratory instruction and supervision of student research (e.g., student thesis or project and intern supervision), and Three (3) units of indirect instructional activity (e.g., student advisement, curriculum development and improvements, committee assignments, and other non-teaching activities) in support of the faculty member's department, college and university. New faculty members carry a significantly reduced teaching load in the first two years to enable them to establish an active research program. In addition to these activities, a faculty member is expected, to maintain excellence in teaching and to continually improve his/her instructional effectiveness. This involves, at a minimum, broadening and deepening knowledge of the academic field, remaining abreast of new developments in the field, and effectively instructing students in the discipline. Involvement in research, publication, and other professional activity is required and service to the community deriving from professional knowledge and experience is also expected as well as University service. Salary range, based on preparation and experience: Assistant Professor $51,312 - $61,860 Associate Professor $59,028 - $67,994. Letter of application, statement of research plans, statement of teaching philosophy, curriculum vitae (including an e-mail address), official transcripts from graduate and undergraduate institutions, and three letters of recommendation. Employment is contingent upon proof of the legal right to work in the United States. This proof must be provided at the time of employment at the university. An appointment will not be final until proof is provided. Review of applications will begin on 30 September 2005 and will continue until the position is filled (or recruitment cancelled). Applications, required documentation, and requests for information should be addressed to: Chair, Organic Chemist Search Committee, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower, Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840-3903, pbuonora@csulb.edu.

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As part of the College of Pharmacy's continuing emphasis on research at the interface of Chemistry and Biology, the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Michigan invites applications for a tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level. Applications for a more advanced position from well-qualified candidates will also be considered. Potential areas of research may include, but are not limited to, synthetic organic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, mechanistic enzymology, and structural biochemistry, all of which should be focused on exciting medicinal targets and rationales. The Department of Medicinal Chemistry has long been recognized as one of the leading interdisciplinary programs in the country. Applicants will be expected to continue to build on this tradition. A distinguished academic record, the potential for independent, fundable research and a commitment to quality teaching at the graduate and graduate professional levels are essential. The successful candidate will have the opportunity for collaborative interactions with the University's Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences Institute and various departments in the School of Medicine. This position is available immediately and applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Applications including a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, a research prospective, and three references should be sent to: Prof. Ronald W. Woodard, Chair, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Michigan, 428 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1065.

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Kenyon College invites applications for a new tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level beginning July 2006. The Chemistry Department seeks candidates having expertise in nanoscience or materials chemistry. Teaching responsibilities could include introductory, inorganic, instrumental analysis and/or advanced topic chemistry courses. Ph.D. required and post-doctoral experience preferred. Successful candidates should be committed to teaching excellence and establishing an active research program involving undergraduates. Outstanding facilities and instrumentation for research and teaching are available; start-up funds and salary are very competitive. Kenyon College is a nationally ranked, highly selective liberal arts college located in the beautiful village of Gambier, approximately 45 miles northeast of Columbus, Ohio. Please visit http://chem.kenyon.edu for more information. To apply, submit a c.v., copies of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, a statement of teaching philosophy and interests, a brief description of research plans, and three letters of recommendation to: Prof. James Keller, Faculty Search, Department of Chemistry, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022. Review of dossiers will begin on October 11.

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University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Chemistry is entering a phase of long-term growth and invites applications for three positions in all areas of biochemistry, experimental physical chemistry, and organic chemistry. Although preference will be given to tenure-track assistant professors, applications at all levels are welcome. The successful candidate will be expected to carry out a full and vigorous program of innovative research and to contribute to the teaching of graduate and undergraduate students. Women and minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. Please submit applications, including curriculum vitae, list of publications, summary of past research, plans for future research, and letters of reference from three individuals who are familiar with the candidate's work by October 12, 2005 to: Robert Gordon, Chair of the Chemistry Search Committee, Department of Chemistry (M/C 111), The University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607-7061.

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The Scripps Research Institute invites applicants for up to two tenure-track faculty positions at the Assistant Professor level in the Department of Chemistry. Duties include teaching at the graduate level and developing a dynamic, innovative and independent research program. Although excellence in any field of chemistry is the main criterion for selection, special emphasis will be placed on the areas of chemical synthesis and chemical biology. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae, publications list, and a short description of future research plans, and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be received at the following address no later than October 17, 2005: Search Committee, c/o Professor K.C. Nicolaou, Chairman, Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, BCC 405, La Joilla, CA 92037.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS

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A post-doctoral position is available immediately in the Guan Laboratory in the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, CA. One research thrust in Guan laboratory is developing new strategies for polymer topology control using transition metal catalysts. In the past few years, we have developed highly efficient catalytic processes for producing polymers with complex topologies from simple monomers. Currently we are applying our methodology to the design and synthesis of various nanostructured dendritic materials.A postdoctoral research fellow is immediately available for working on late transition metal-calayzed polymerization for the synthesis nanostructured polymers for biomedical applications. The project requires skills and experience for carrying out the following aspects of studies: (1) synthesis of transition metal organometallic complexes as polymerization catalysts; (2) use of these catalysts in polymerization for the synthesis of dendritic polymers; and (3) bioconjugation of peptides/proteins or other imaging agents onto the dendritic scaffolds for biomedical applications. Working knowledge of standard techniques in organic/organometallic and polymer synthesis is expected. To apply, please send a curriculum vitae and the names, phone numbers and e-mail addresses of three references to: Prof. Zhibin Guan, Dept. of Chemistry, University of California, 516 Rowland Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-2025, USA or apply by email to: zguan@uci.edu. Additional information regarding the lab and these projects can be found on our web site at: http://www.chem.uci.edu/people/faculty/zguan/.

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Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University. Two postdoctoral positions are available to work in the area of identification and characterization of estrogen-derived DNA adducts that are believed to be involved in breast and prostate cancer. The candidates will be involved in the development of advanced techniques for cancer risk assessment. The lab currently focuses on: i) further development of monoclonal antibody-gold biosensor chips (with imaging capabilities) for detection and quantitation of biomarkers implicated in breast and prostate cancers, ii) fabrication of various mierofluidic devices using a dynamic multiple equilibrium gradients (DMEG) approach to improved the resolving power, and iii) development of fluorescence affinity probe capillary electrophoresis for detection of catechol estrogen derived DNA adducts and metabolites. Other possible projects involve DMEG driven desalination of seawater and development of various bioreactors for protein crystallization. For postdoctoral fellows a strong background in laser-based spectroscopies, microfluidics, and bioanalytical chemistry is essential. We are seeking candidates who are self-motivated and career-oriented. Screening of applications will begin October 1, 2005 and continue until positions are filled. Applicants should arrange for a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and two letters of recommendation to be sent to: Professor Ryszard Jankowiak, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66502; Voice: (785) 532-6785; Email: ryszard@ksu.edu.

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Kansas State University. A postdoctoral position is available for work in the area of photosynthesis research. We use spectral hole-burning (SHB) and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) to study the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes of several photosynthetic protein complexes at low temperatures. Both SHB and SPCS systems will allow for Stark spectroscopy and the study of pressure effects. The combination of SHB on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that will address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae and initiate studies to integrate various photosynthetic complexes with molecular electronics. A better understanding of the EET and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are organized by a macromolecular scaffold. The lab currently focuses on development of photovoltaic devices based on various photosynthetic complexes. For postdoctoral fellows a strong background in low temperature laser-based spectroscopies and physical/biophysical chemistry is essential. We are seeking candidates who are self motivated and career-oriented. Screening of applications will begin October 1, 2005 and will continue until position is filled. Applicants should arrange for a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and two letters of recommendation to be sent to: Professor Ryszard Jankowiak Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66502; Voice: (785) 5326785; E-mail: ryszard@ksu.edu.

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NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON SEPTEMBER 26th, 2005.