Chemistry Newsletter - 09/02/2008

 


University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter



XXXII - No. 27 September 2nd, 2008

********************

Chemistry Newsletter Back To Weekly Schedule Starting September 15th

 

The Chemistry Newsletter will be published weekly again starting with the next issue, September 15th. Please continue to submit any newsletter items to Bruce Goldade in room 1146 or by e-mail to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu. Thank You.

********************

Introductory Research Talks in Physical Chemistry 2008

Thursdays 5:45-7:45 p.m., Room 8335

For entering graduate students interested in physical chemistry, there will be a series of short talks by faculty members describing their research interests. These will be held at 5:45 p.m. on Thursdays during the first week of the semester. There will be one half-hour talk followed by an informal supper and then two more talks.

Since these talks are brief, students should follow up by contacting individual faculty members in whose research they are interested. Each student should interview at least three faculty members during the fall semester concerning research opportunities.

These talks are a means of finding research opportunities and of obtaining a broad overview of physical chemistry research in the Department. Students expecting to major in physical chemistry should make every effort to attend all of these talks. Teaching Assistants should mark this time on the schedule cards turned in to the teaching Laboratory Director.

Schedule for Introductory Research Talks

 

5:45

6:45

7:15

7:45

September 4th

Hamers

Record

Keutsch

September 11th

Gellman

Cui

Mahanthappa

Jin

September 18th

Cavagnero

Schmidt

Ediger

Yu

September 25th

Yethiraj

Brunold

Zanni

October 2nd

Nathanson

Weisshaar

Crim

October 9th

Skinner

Sanders

Landis

October 16th

Sibert

Wright

McMahon

********************

Analytical, Inorganic & Materials Faculty Research Talks – Fall 2008

Room 8335 Chemistry

Note to students: One of the best things you can do as a new graduate student is to learn about what’s going on in various faculty members’ labs. The analytical, inorganic and materials faculty will be giving a series of short talks on their research. Sessions will be held in Room 8335 beginning at 5:45 p.m. on Mondays during the first weeks of the semester. There will be four 20-minute talks and an informal supper.

This is a great chance to learn about on-going and future research directions, both inside and outside of your immediate area, and to meet faculty on an informal basis. Even if you do not plan to work for a particular professor, it is always good to know what is happening.

We hope that you will take this opportunity to learn about what is going on in the department. Analytical and Materials students will be required to meet with at least four different professors at some point following these talks, with the goal of joining a research group after November 1st, but no later than November 15, 2008. A form for tracking these appointments will be placed in your mailboxes. Inorganic students must meet with a minimum of four professors – at least three during September. If you have questions, please contact your division coordinators.

 

5:45

6:10

6:35

7:00

7:25

7:50

Sept. 8th

Gopalan

Jin

Refreshments

Wright

Mahanthappa

Sanders

Sept. 15th

Stahl

Lingjun Li

Refreshments

Ediger

Schwartz

Sept. 22nd

Keutsch

Brunold

Refreshments

Hamers

Burstyn

Oct. 1st

Coon

Weisshaar

Refreshments

Landis

Yoon

Oct. 6th

Moore

Berry

Refreshments

Smith

Cavagnero

Fredrickson

********************

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel News Article on Professor Helen Blackwell

UW Chemist learning how to trick killer bugs into being peaceful.

Some molecules can keep bacteria from communicating.

By ELIE DOLGIN. edolgin@journalsentinel.com. Posted: Aug. 17, 2008.

When bacteria start talking, bad things happen. Many bacteria release chemical signals in search of their “friends.” When chemical levels remain low, the bacteria don’t make much mischief. But when the bugs congregate, chemicals build up, which alerts the microbes that there are enough of them to kick off an infection. These collective infections can be especially severe and hard to treat. But Helen Blackwell, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of chemistry, thinks she’s found a way to stop these bacterial social gatherings before they start. By mimicking the chemicals that bacteria use to talk to each other, Blackwell is working to develop new drugs to trick the microbes. And the approach has shown success. Already, Blackwell’s group has found many new compounds to block the chemical conversations behind two of the most common sources of hospital-acquired infections: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA; and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic invader of patients with compromised immune systems. Drugs that target the microbes’ social traits, rather than killing every individual, might offer another bonus in the fight against bacterial super-bugs: They should also slow the rate at which bacteria develop drug resistance compared with traditional drug approaches. “You’re not actually killing the bugs, so there’s not the selective pressure in the same way,” said Steve Diggle, a microbiologist at the University of Nottingham in England, who specializes in studying bacterial communication. “You’re targeting the group as a whole. You’re tackling billions of individuals. So, it’s a lot less likely that they’ll evolve resistance.”

Responses triggered

The bacteria’s communication system, known as “quorum sensing,” triggers a wide range of responses, including virulence factor production, glowing bioluminescence and the formation of slimy bacterial mats called biofilms - the primary source of dental plaque and numerous chronic infections. Importantly for Blackwell, a chemist trained in stitching together molecules, the bacterial chatter is spoken in the language of small molecules - a group of compounds that are smaller than proteins yet biologically active. “Since the whole system is mediated by small molecules, it’s like a sandbox for chemists to play in,” said Blackwell, who was named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10” last year. To explain the game of synthesizing small molecules, Reto Frei, one of Blackwell’s graduate students, grabbed a Sharpie pen and started scribbling on the glass front of the laboratory fume hood. He sketched a thick, flat line showing the filter paper they use as base. The filter paper costs only pennies apiece, and it can be manipulated much more easily than traditional techniques dependent on resin-based substrates, Frei said. Frei then drew in evenly spaced little spikes, or “mini skyscrapers” as he called them, in a spreadsheet-like grid on the paper. On top of the spikes, Blackwell’s team mixes and matches chemicals to create vast arrays of different chemical combinations, he explained. To make the chemicals react quickly, they pop the spotted paper into an industrial-grade microwave oven, which helps generate hundreds of molecules within a matter of minutes to hours. “If you do traditional chemistry in solution, it would take a whole day to make one compound,” said Thanit Praneenararat, another graduate student. The dizzying array of new molecules alone is not the goal. “I’m most excited not about the novel compounds but about the novel activity,” Blackwell said.

Promise shown

Among all the new compounds Blackwell and her students have synthesized, a dozen or so are showing promising biological activity. Some of these work well specifically against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other related Gram-negative bacteria, the group that causes the majority of hospital infections. Blackwell’s approach starts with the microbe’s own signaling molecule, which usually turns on biofilm formation at sufficient concentrations. But Blackwell makes slightly modified analogs to out-compete the natural molecule in binding to its receptor. In this way, she found that by adding a large chemical ring “dumbbell” onto the molecule’s tail, sprinkled with highly reactive halogen elements, she could significantly blunt the bug’s signaling ability, both in a lab dish and inside other organisms. For a study published online last month in the ISME Journal, Blackwell teamed up with Jo Handelsman, a UW-Madison professor of bacteriology and plant pathology, to show that her signaling inhibitors reduced Pseudomonas’ infectivity of cabbage white butterfly larvae by more than 50%. “This inhibitor is doing awfully well,” Handelsman said. “It’s pretty strong evidence that you can introduce a chemical inhibitor to block quorum sensing and pathogen induction.” Blackwell doesn’t always want to turn the bacterial dialogue off, however. For “good” bacteria, such as those that can slurp up pollution or manufacture biofuels, Blackwell and her research team are also looking for molecules that promote cell signaling. As a glowing endorsement to this approach, Blackwell, with UW-Madison medical microbiology and immunology professor Edward Ruby, discovered a molecule that induces bacterial signaling in Vibrio fischeri, a luminescent bacterium that resides in the light organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid. In an as-yet unpublished study, Blackwell and Ruby added their molecule into the squid’s sea water, and the organ lighted up like a neon sign. “We believe the compounds freely diffused up into the light organ of the animal, interacted with the bacteria,” and made it glow, Blackwell said.

Taking on a killer

Blackwell is also turning toward preventing cell-cell communication in Staphylococcus aureus, the bacterium legendary for its highly resilient form, MRSA, which kills tens of thousands of people in hospitals every year. Staphylococcus, however, is part of the so-called Gram-positive group of bacteria, a completely different class than Pseudomonas. As such, its cell signaling follows a different, more elaborate pathway than the simpler system of Gram-negative bacteria. “There are many more players involved,” said Blackwell. In June, Blackwell published a paper in the journal Organic Letters reporting synthesis of the first non-natural protein-like molecule that blocks part of the notorious super-bug’s communication pathway. “Helen (Blackwell) is an example of one of the very, very best chemists that works well with biologists,” said Handelsman. The goal in the long run, Blackwell said, is to develop her compounds into therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, most large pharmaceutical companies are no longer involved in antibiotic research and development, because the drugs are not seen as profitable. Blackwell hopes academic-driven research can fill the gap. This is especially urgent as current antibiotics are reaching the limits of their effectiveness with resistant bacterial strains continuing to spread around the world. “It’s reaching crisis proportion,” Blackwell said. “This is going to become a real issue in the next decade.”

********************


SEMINARS

********************

Tuesday, September 9th, 2008 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. David Chandler, Sandia National Laboratory. “Ion Imaging and the Search for the Ultra-Cold Molecule”

********************

Tuesday, September 9th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Richmond Sarpong, University of California-Berkeley. “Tactics and Strategies Inspired by Seven-Membered Rings in Natural Products”

********************

Wednesday, September 10th, 2008 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Don Tilley, Berkeley.

********************

Friday, September 12th, 2008 - EC&T Seminar, 12:05 p.m., 102 Water Science & Engineering Lab. Professor Tomoaki Okuda, Keio University, Tokyo. “Effects of a Platinum-Cerium Bimetallic Fuel Additive on the Chemical Composition of Diesel Engine Exhaust particles”

********************

Saturday, September 13th, 2008 - SNOUT OUT 2008, 12 Noon-5:00 p.m., Rennebohm Park. Sponsored by GSFLC. Food, drinks, softball & general fun!

********************

Tuesday, September 16th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry and Analytical/Materials Chemistry Seminars: The Edward Noble Kramer Distinguished Interdisciplinary Lecture, 3:30 p.m., Engineering Room TBA. Professor Matt Tirrell, University of California, Santa Barbara. “Peptide Materials Science”

********************

Wednesday, September 17th, 2008 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Terrance Collins, Carnegie Mellon University. “Iron-TAML activators: effective green chemistry catalysts for peroxide activation”

********************

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Pablo Debenedetti, Princeton University. “Water in Confined Spaces”

********************

Friday, September 26th, 2008 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Glen Ruskin: Director, Office of Public Affairs; American Chemical Society. “The Chemistry of Advocacy”

********************

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008 - Ferry Lecture in Macromolecular Science, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jean Frechet. “Polymer Therapeutics: Designing Macromolecules for Chemo- or Immuno-Therapy”

********************

Friday, October 3rd, 2008 - Ferry Lecture in Macromolecular Science, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jean Frechet. “The Importance of Molecular Architecture: Polymers from Catalysis to Photovoltaics”

********************

Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christina White, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

********************

Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Schlossman, University of Illinois at Chicago. “New Developments in Liquid Interfacial Nanoscience”

********************

Monday, October 13th, 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Energy and Nanoscience - A More Perfect Union”

********************

Tuesday, October 14th, 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Charge Transport in Molecular Junctions: Mechanism and Behaviors”

********************

Wednesday, October 15th , 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Charge Transport in Molecular Junctions: Vibrations, Decoherence, Raman and Signatures”

********************

Tuesday, October 21st , 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Garnet Chan, Cornell.

********************

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joseph Ready, University of Texas-Southwestern. “Stereoselective Functionalization of Alkynes: Methodology Development and Synthetic Applications”

********************

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joe Francisco, Purdue University. “New Insights into HOCO Radical Chemistry”

********************

Friday, November 7th, 2008 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Biddy Martin, Chancellor, UW-Madison.

********************

Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Patricia Clark, University of Notre Dame. “Using the Free Energy of Folding to Transport Proteins Across a Membrane”

********************

Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Tom Hoye, University of Minnesota.

********************

Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Arthur L. Utz, Tufts University. “Bond-Selective Control of a Heterogeneously Catalyzed Reaction”

********************

Friday, November 21st, 2008 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor John Moore, UW-Madison. “The Chemical Education Digital Library: A New Online Resource for Teachers and Students”

********************

Tuesday, November 25th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Gerhard Hummer, NIDDK.

********************

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David Manolopolus, University of Oxford. “Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics”

********************

Tuesday, January 27th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ilan Benjamin, University of California. “Relaxation and Reactions at Water Surfaces”

********************

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Bern Kohler, Ohio State University.

********************

Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor William L. Hase, Texas Tech University. “Dynamics and Kinetics of Heat Transfer at Nano-Scale Interfaces”

********************

Friday, February 13th, 2009 - Department Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Tim Donahue, Director of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Center, UW-Madison, Department of Bacteriology.

********************

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Troy Van Voorhis, MIT. “Exploring Electron Transfer: From Simple Photochemistry to Energy Conversion”

********************

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kristie Boering, University of California.

********************

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Austen Angell, Arizona State University. “The Art and Science of Supercooling:” “Ideal Glassformers” vs “Ideal Glasses”

********************

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Doug Weibel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry.

********************

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Paul Hergenrother, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

********************

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sunney Xie, Harvard.

********************

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Andrew Phillips, University of Colorado-Boulder.

********************

Monday, April 6th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 1:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

********************

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

********************

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel T. Hess, University of Maine.

********************

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

********************

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

********************

Thursday, April 23rd, 2009 - Organic Chemistry - Abbott Lecturers, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dave Evans, Harvard University.

********************

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University.

********************

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. William Roush, Scripps.

********************

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry building. Professor Lewis Kay, University of Toronto.

********************

Tuesday May 5th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

********************

Wednesday, May 6 th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

********************


********************

An Invitation to Participate in Science Is Fun Presentations

The Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy (WISL) invites undergraduate and graduate students to participate in Science is Fun Student Public Presentations and outreach events during the 2008 Fall semester. To learn more about WISL please visit our web site: www.scifun.org.

Science Is Fun Presentations are offered both on and off campus to a wide variety of audiences including students, teachers, parents, and members of the community at large. Presenters will gain experience in the safe and proper presentation of science demonstrations in school settings, shopping malls, and other public venues. New presenters will join an experienced staff who enjoy doing demonstrations and who continue to develop the art of presenting a science demonstration. Training will involve: learning scientific principles and phenomena, mastering safety practices, learning proper staging, and developing skills for connecting with different audiences. Presenters will become comfortable in genuinely sharing their personal joy in doing science.

Weekly sessions will be held from 2:25 to 4:20 p.m. on Thursdays in Room B371 Chemistry. Undergraduate students may elect to register for one credit in directed (Chemistry 299) or independent study (Chemistry 699). Graduate students may receive credit in Chemistry 901-The Teaching of Chemistry.

If you are interested in participating in Science is Fun Student Public Presentations, please contact Dr. Linda Zelewski at zelewski@chem.wisc.edu. Please tell us a little bit about yourself and how this program fits in with your interests. Space is limited so you are encouraged to respond as soon as possible if you are interested.

********************


********************

Recent Publications

********************

A proteomics grade electron transfer dissociation-enabled hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer.

McAlister, GC; Berggren, WT; Griep-Raming, J; Horning, S; Makarov, A; Phanstiel, D; Stafford, G; Swaney, DL; Syka, JEP; Zabrouskov, V; Coon, JJ*.

JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH 7 (8): 3127-3136 AUG 2008.

********************

Self-assembled collagen-like peptide fibers as templates for metallic nanowires.

Gottlieb, D; Morin, SA; Jin, S*; Raines, RT*.

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY 18 (32): 3865-3870 2008.

********************

Identification and utility of FdmR1 as a Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein activator for fredericamycin production in Streptomyces griseus ATCC 49344 and heterologous hosts.

Chen, Y; Wendt-Pienkowski, E; Shen, B*.

JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY 190 (16): 5587-5596 AUG 2008.

********************

Spin-dependent tunneling transport into CrO2 nanorod devices with nonmagnetic contacts.

Song, YP; Schmitt, AL; Jin, S*.

NANO LETTERS 8 (8): 2356-2361 AUG 2008.

********************

Photo-induced surface functionalization of carbon surfaces: The role of photoelectron ejection.

Colavita, PE; Sun, B; Tse, KY; Hamers, RJ*.

JOURNAL OF VACUUM SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY A 26 (4): 925-931 JUL-AUG 2008.

********************

Tuning aryl, hydrazine radical cation electronic interactions using substitutent effects.

Valverde-Aguilar, G; Wang, XH; Plummer, E; Lockard, JV; Zink, JI; Luo, Y; Weaver, MN; Nelsen, SF*.

JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY A 112 (32): 7332-7341 AUG 12 2008.

********************

Copyright © 2008 Thomson ISI

********************


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

********************

None for This Newsletter

********************


FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

********************

Chemistry/assistant Professor. Otterbein College, a comprehensive liberal arts institution in the suburban Columbus area, invites applications for a tenure-track position in Physical Chemistry beginning Fall 2009. Teaching responsibilities within the ACS-approved department will include general studies, introductory, and advanced courses. PhD required; postdoctoral and teaching experience preferred. The ability to integrate biochemical applications into undergraduate research and teaching is desired. The successful candidates will possess a strong commitment to teaching and conduct an active, externally-funded undergraduate research program. Send letter of interest, curriculum vitae, three (3) current letters of recommendation, and statement of research plans to: Dr. Abíódún Gòkè-Paríolá, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Otterbein College, One Otterbein College, Westerville, OH 43081. Email submissions: academicjobs@otterbein.edu. Review of applications begins October 1, 2008 until the position is filled. Visit us at http://www.otterbein.edu/dept/chem for further information.

********************

The Department of Chemistry of Columbia University is seeking to appoint a new faculty member. The position can be filled at any rank, from tenure-track assistant professor to full professor with tenure. Candidates with research interests in all areas of chemistry will be considered. A Ph.D. is required. Applicants for this position at the assistant professor level must have the potential to do pioneering research and to teach effectively using modern tools of instruction. These candidates should submit with their application a Curriculum Vita, a brief statement of their research plans, and have three letters of recommendation sent on their behalf. Applicants for this position at the tenured professor level must have a demonstrated record of outstanding research accomplishments and excellent teaching credentials. These candidates should submit with their application a Curriculum Vita that includes a complete publication list and a record of research funding. Please visit our online application site at: http://academicjobs.columbia.eduJapplicants/Central?quickFind=50698 for further information about this position and to submit your application. Review of applications will begin on October 8, 2008 and continue until the position is filled.

********************

The Amherst College Department of Chemistry https://cms.amherstedu/academiclife/departments/chemistry invites applications for a full-time tenure-track assistant professorship in biochemistry or bioorganic chemistry beginning in July 2009. The position requires a Ph.D. and calls for teaching chemistry at the introductory and advanced undergraduate levels. Opportunities for teaching in interdisciplinary courses and programs are also available. The successful candidate will be expected to establish a vigorous research program in which undergraduates can substantively participate. The research program can span the boundaries between biochemistry and other sciences. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, a statement of teaching philosophy, and a detailed description of their research plans, and should arrange for the forwarding of three letters of reference, all to: Professor Mark D. Marshall, Chair, Department of Chemistry, Amherst College, P.O. Box 5000, Amherst, MA 01002-5000. Review of materials will begin October 13, 2008, and will continue until the position is filled.

********************

The Department of Chemistry at Clemson University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in the broadly defined area of organic chemistry. Candidates with research interests in organic, bioorganic, organic synthesis, materials, structural biology, medicinal chemistry or related fields are encouraged to apply. Candidates must possess a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry and will be expected to teach organic chemistry at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The position is expected to be filled at the rank of Assistant Professor, however a more advanced rank may be considered, depending on experience and qualifications. Application materials, including a curriculum vitae, a description of proposed research plan(s), teaching philosophy, and three letters of reference (pdf email preferred) should be sent to: Professor R. Karl Dieter at the following address: Department of Chemistry, ORGANIC POSITION, c/o Mrs. Sharon Smith, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973. Electronic submissions accepted at: sharons@clemson.edu, TEL: 864-656-5017. Review of applications will begin September 1, 2008 and continue until the position is filled. The expected start date is August 2009.

********************


********************

POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS

********************

Jeff Rack, Ohio University is seeking a physical or inorganic chemist for a postdoctoral position in his laboratory available immediately. The position involves coordination chemistry and photochemistry of transition metal photochromic/electrochromic complexes for the development of solar-driven molecular photoelectrochemical devices. Interested applicants should send their CV to him by e-mail to: rackj@ohio.edu.

********************

Dr. Mathieu Pucheault is looking for someone who would be interested by doing a post doc in chemistry/chemical biology in his group. The funding is for one year starting this fall/winter. The main theme of the project is modifications of protein using chemical tools and involves mainly classical organic synthesis. Additionally, the other aspect of the project is the preparation and target identification of some pro carcinogenic molecules. It would be of great help if you could pass this information around. More details on : http://www.abg.asso.fr/offre_voir.php?offre=68124&nature=1&mz=1. Contact: Dr. Mathieu Pucheault, Chargé de Recherches CNRS, Laboratoire Chimie et Photonique Moléculaires, Pièce 210 - Batiment 10A - UMR 6510, Université de Rennes 1 - Campus de Beaulieu - Case 1003, 263 Avenue du général Leclerc CS 74205, 35042 Rennes Cedex - France, Tél : (+33) 2 23 23 60 72, Fax : (+33) 2 23 23 69 55, web: http://www.umr6510.univ-rennes1.fr/, or http://perso.univ-rennes1.fr/mathieu.pucheault/.

********************


Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON SEPTEMBER 15th, 2008.