Chemistry Newsletter - 08/18/2008

 


University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter



XXXII - No. 26 August 18th, 2008

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Kids Camp Teaches Forensics\ Fake Crime-Scene Probes Draw Students Into World Of Chemistry

Wisconsin State Journal :: LOCAL :: A5, Monday, August 11, 2008, By PAMELA COTANT For the State Journal. Nick Gabel enjoyed the Fun with Forensic Science camp so much it made him think about a career in the field. “I think this camp has inspired me” to become a crime scene investigator, said Gabel, who will be a seventh-grader in New Glarus. The camp features activities that mimic crime-scene investigations and guest speakers from forensic science-related careers also speak to the group. Gabel had other thoughts when he signed up for the camp - one of four Fun with Chemistry Camps run by the Institute for Chemical Education in the summer. “I thought it sounded interesting and I wanted to meet new people,” he said. The four camps include one that's called Fun with Chemistry and two others called the Science Behind the Superhero and Fun with Chemistry Inventions. The weeklong camps, which run in the afternoons in the Chemistry Building on the UW-Madison campus, are open to students in grades five through eight. The forensic camp is one of the most popular and was full with 50 students. “I think the forensics one is the most popular because of the crime scenes that are on television,” said Jenny Powell, program director for the camp and associate outreach specialist at UW-Madison. “Forensics is fun. It's a fun way to learn science.” Guest speakers include a forensic pathologist, a Madison police detective and someone with a doctorate in clinical laboratory science who talked about blood and urine analysis. The camps are designed to get kids excited about science, to give them more self-confidence in their abilities to learn science and to present scientists as "just regular people," Powell said. Vishal Narayanaswamy, who will be in sixth grade at Jefferson Middle School this year, attended all four camps this summer. “My mom told me about these chemistry camps so I thought, ‘Sure,’” he said. “Just seeing a chemical reaction occurring is mind-boggling.” Narayanaswamy said learning about chemistry will be helpful in his career aspirations. “I have an ambition to be a cardiologist because I think it's noble to save people's lives,” he said.

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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Tom Record, UW-Madison, Department of Chemistry. “Hofmeister Salt and Solute Effects on Aqueous Processes”

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Tuesday, September 9th, 2008 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. David Chandler, Sandia National Laboratory. “Ion Imaging and the Search for the Ultra-Cold Molecule”

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Tuesday, September 9th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Richmond Sarpong, University of California-Berkeley. “Tactics and Strategies Inspired by Seven-Membered Rings in Natural Products”

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Wednesday, September 10th, 2008 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Don Tilley, Berkeley.

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Saturday, September 13th, 2008 - SNOUT OUT 2008, 12 Noon-5:00 p.m., Rennebohm Park. Sponsored by GSFLC. Food, drinks, softball & general fun!

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Tuesday, September 16th, 2008 - The Edward Noble Kramer Distinguished Interdisciplinary Lecture, 3:30 p.m., Engineering Room TBA. Professor Matt Tirrell, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Wednesday, September 17th, 2008 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Terrance Collins, Carnegie Mellon University. “Iron-TAML activators: effective green chemistry catalysts for peroxide activation”

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Tuesday, September 23rd, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Pablo Debenedetti, Princeton University.

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Thursday, October 2nd, 2008 - Ferry Lecture in Macromolecular Science, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jean Frechet. “Polymer Therapeutics: Designing Macromolecules for Chemo- or Immuno-Therapy”

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Friday, October 3rd, 2008 - Ferry Lecture in Macromolecular Science, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jean Frechet. “The Importance of Molecular Architecture: Polymers from Catalysis to Photovoltaics”

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Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christina White, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Tuesday, October 7th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Schlossman, University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Monday, October 13th, 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Energy and Nanoscience - A More Perfect Union”

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Tuesday, October 14th, 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Charge Transport in Molecular Junctions: Mechanism and Behaviors”

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Wednesday, October 15th , 2008 - Joseph O. Hirschfelder Lectures in Theoretical Chemistry, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark Ratner, Northwestern University. “Charge Transport in Molecular Junctions: Vibrations, Decoherence, Raman and Signatures”

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Tuesday, October 21st , 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Garnet Chan, Cornell.

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Tuesday, October 21st, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joseph Ready, University of Texas-Southwestern. “Stereoselective Functionalization of Alkynes: Methodology Development and Synthetic Applications”

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Tuesday, October 28th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joe Francisco, Purdue University. “New Insights into HOCO Radical Chemistry”

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Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Patricia Clark, University of Notre Dame. “Using the Free Energy of Folding to Transport Proteins Across a Membrane”

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Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Tom Hoye, University of Minnesota.

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Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Arthur L. Utz, Tufts University. “Bond-Selective Control of a Heterogeneously Catalyzed Reaction”

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Tuesday, November 25th, 2008 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Gerhard Hummer, NIDDK.

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Tuesday, January 20th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David Manolopolus, University of Oxford. “Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics”

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Tuesday, January 27th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ilan Benjamin, University of California. “Relaxation and Reactions at Water Surfaces”

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Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Bern Kohler, Ohio State University.

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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor William L. Hase, Texas Tech University. “Dynamics and Kinetics of Heat Transfer at Nano-Scale Interfaces”

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Tuesday, February 17th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Troy Van Voorhis, MIT. “Exploring Electron Transfer: From Simple Photochemistry to Energy Conversion”

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Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kristie Boering, University of California.

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Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Austen Angell, Arizona State University. “The Art and Science of Supercooling:” “Ideal Glassformers” vs “Ideal Glasses”

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Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Doug Weibel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry.

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Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Paul Hergenrother, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - McElvain Seminar in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sunney Xie, Harvard.

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Tuesday, March 31st, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Andrew Phillips, University of Colorado-Boulder.

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Monday, April 6th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 1:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 7th, 2009 - John E. Willard Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor James G. Anderson, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel T. Hess, University of Maine.

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Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

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Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 - Bernstein Lectures in Physical Chemistry, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Raphael D. Levine, Hebrew University.

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Thursday, April 23rd, 2009 - Organic Chemistry - Abbott Lecturers, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dave Evans, Harvard University.

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Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University.

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Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. William Roush, Scripps.

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Tuesday, May 5th, 2009 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry building. Professor Lewis Kay, University of Toronto.

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Tuesday May 5th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

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Wednesday, May 6 th, 2009 - Organic Chemistry Hirschmann Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Prof. Barry Trost, Stanford University.

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Recent Publications

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Electronic structure and spectroscopy of "superoxidized" iron centers in model systems: theoretical and experimental trends.

Berry, JF*; George, SD; Neese, F.

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS 10 (30): 4361-4374 2008.

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Deciphering a protolanguage for bacteria-host communication.

Palmer, AG; Blackwell, HE*.

NATURE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY 4 (8): 452-454 AUG 2008.

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Carbon-nitrogen bond formation involving well-defined aryl-copper(III) complexes.

Huffman, LM; Stahl, SS*.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 130 (29): 9196-+ JUL 23 2008.

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Imaging and analysis of transcription on large, surface-mounted single template DNA molecules.

Yu, H; Schwartz, DC*.

ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY 380 (1): 111-121 SEP 1 2008.

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Allostery and cooperativity revisited.

Cui, Q*; Karplus, M.

PROTEIN SCIENCE 17 (8): 1295-1307 AUG 2008.

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CE-MS analysis of the human urinary proteome for biomarker discovery and disease diagnostics.

Coon, JJ*; Zurbig, P; Dakna, M; Dominicza, AF; Decramer, S; Fliser, D; Frommberger, M; Golovko, I; Good, DM; Herget-Rosenthal, S; Jankowski, J; Julian, BA; Kellmann, M; Kolch, W; Massy, Z; Novak, J; Rossing, K; Schanstra, JP; Schiffer, E; Theodorescu, D; Vanholder, R; Weissinger, EM; Mischak, H; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

PROTEOMICS CLINICAL APPLICATIONS 2 (7-8): 964-973 JUL 2008.

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Nanotechnology - Diamonds are for tethers.

Hamers, RJ*.

NATURE 454 (7205): 708-709 AUG 7 2008.

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Stabilization of ketone and aldehyde enols by formation of hydrogen bonds to phosphazene enolates and their aldol products.

Kolonko, KJ; Reich, HJ*.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 130 (30): 9668-+ JUL 30 2008.

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Thermodynamic origin of Hofmeister ion effects

Pegram, LM; Record, MT*.

JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B 112 (31): 9428-9436 AUG 7 2008.

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Highly conductive trimethylsilyl oligo(ethylene oxide) electrolytes for energy storage applications.

Zhang, LZ; Zhang, ZC; Harring, S; Straughan, M; Butorac, R; Chen, ZH; Lyons, L; Amine, K; West, R*.

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY 18 (31): 3713-3717 2008.

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Revealing the role of phosphatidylserine in shear stress-mediated protection in endothelial cells.

Freed, JK; Shortreed, MR; Kleefisch, CJ; Smith, LM*; Greene, AS.

ENDOTHELIUM-JOURNAL OF ENDOTHELIAL CELL RESEARCH 15 (4): 225-230 2008.

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Glycotripod amphiphiles for solubilization and stabilization of a membrane-protein superassembly: Importance of branching in the hydrophilic portion.

Chae, PS; Wander, MJ; Bowling, AP; Laible, PD; Gellman, SH*.

CHEMBIOCHEM 9 (11): 1706-1709 JUL 21 2008.

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Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

Westphall, MS; Jorabchi, K; Smith, LM*.

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 80 (15): 5847-5853 AUG 1 2008.

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Laser-induced phosphorescence for the in situ detection of glyoxal at part per trillion mixing ratios.

Huisman, AJ; Hottle, JR; Coens, KL; DiGangi, JP; Galloway, MM; Kammrath, A; Keutsch, FN*.

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 80 (15): 5884-5891 AUG 1 2008.

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Copyright © 2008 Thomson ISI

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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NMR Spectroscopist at Procter and Gamble, China. Are you looking for a challenging career with the world’s largest consumer product company in the world’s fastest growing region? If so, we need you to apply. The Procter & Gamble Company is currently seeking a Research & Development (R&D) Scientist in its newest technical center located in Beijing, China. The Beijing Technical Center will be staffed with over 600 researchers within the next two years and conduct basic, applied research and product development in the areas of household care, oral care, beauty care, feminine care, baby care, food and beverage. It is a great opportunity for those self-driven and motivated individuals to join a young and enthusiastic organization during such an exciting time. The successful candidate will have responsibility to: Develop and apply NMR capability to solve broad range of R&D problems; Become the technical leader for Asia NMR team; Collaborate with cross functional and cross regional teams; Lead a project team and be accountable for project deliverables; Network with Company’s Global NMR team and external NMR labs to deliver business results. Following qualifications are required: * Strong background in NMR and other analytical methods; Working knowledge of 1D and 2D NMR methods and applications; Experience in Varian system helpful; Broad knowledge in physical and biological science in general to quickly develop understanding of R&D problems in consumer products; Excellent oral and written communication skills and a good team player. PhD degree in Chemistry or related field is required. The job is located in Beijing, China. We will fill this position as soon as possible. For Immediate consideration, please send resume to: Dr Yong Pan at: pan.y@pg.com or Dr Haico Tang at: Tang.h@pg.com.

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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The School of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Georgia Institute of Technology seeks to fill several tenure-track faculty positions. Exceptional candidates at all levels and in all areas are encouraged to apply. We are particularly interested in candidates in analytical, organic, and inorganic fields. Candidates with interdisciplinary interests will be considered for joint appointments with other departments. Further information is available on our Web site: http://www.chemistry.gatech.edu. Candidates at the entry level should send an application letter, curriculum vitae, a summary of research plans, and three letters of reference. Advanced candidates should send a curriculum vitae and the names of three references. All materials and requests for information should be sent to: Chair of the Search Committee, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400. Applications will be considered beginning October 17, 2008 until the positions are filled.

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Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences, Faculty Position for Fall 2009. Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering invites applications for a full-time position in the Chemical Sciences for Fall 2009. The College is seeking exceptional faculty dedicated to undergraduate teaching in the classroom and the research laboratory that engages and inspires students. Commitment to innovation, research, and intellectual vitality through scholarly and other creative endeavors is essential. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in chemistry and be qualified to teach rigorous laboratory-based organic chemistry and general chemistry courses, and at least one advanced topic in an area of specialization. As the major resource for chemistry expertise at Olin, the successful candidate will be expected to collaborate in teaching and research with a relatively small faculty from a range of disciplines. For example, expertise in biologically oriented chemistry would enhance teaching opportunities and facilitate interactions with bioengineering, biological sciences and materials sciences faculty; an interest in employing "green chemistry" in teaching and research would be highly valued and facilitate interactions with faculty and students working in the area of sustainable design. Candidates whose area of expertise is in organic chemistry or biochemistry are especially invited to apply, though applications from other areas will be considered. Please consult our website at: http://www.olin.edu for additional information. Please use your cover letter to specifically address how you would fit into the Olin College community and submit curriculum vitae, a description of teaching philosophy and experience, and a description of a proposed course that you would plan to offer to Olin undergraduates. In addition, please include a description of research plans, particularly with respect to how undergraduates might become involved and the identification of connections that could be made with other faculty. Interested applicants should submit their materials to the address below. Candidates should also arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to this address: facultysearch@olin.edu or Chemical Sciences Faculty Search Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering Olin Way Needham, MA 02492-1200. Applications received prior to October 30, 2008 will be given full consideration. Applications received after October 30, 2008 will be considered depending on the availability of the position.

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The College of Wooster. Physical Chemistry - Tenure-track position beginning August 2009. We seek a physical chemist to teach physical and general chemistry along with other courses in an area of specialization/interest and to establish a vigorous research program involving undergraduates that complements the current research in the department. A Ph.D. is required. Participation in the College's interdisciplinary programs, including First Year Seminar http://academics.wooster.edu/fys/, is supported and expected. The Department has eight full-time, tenure-track faculty positions. A senior thesis project is required for all graduates, which necessitates and supports an active student/faculty research program as as well as a generous faculty leave program. The department occupies a totally renovated 36,000 sf modern laboratory facility. The College of Wooster is an independent liberal arts institution with a commitment to excellence in undergraduate education. AA/EOE. Send résumé, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, statement of teaching philosophy, description of research plans, and three letters of evaluation to: Dr. Judith C. Amburgey-Peters, Chairperson, Department of Chemistry, The College of Wooster, 943 College Mall, Wooster, OH 44691. Review of applications will begin October 1, 2008 and will continue until the position is filled.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS

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Medicinal Chemistry Postdoctoral Research Fellowships. Investigator: Greg Roth. The Burnham Institute for Medical Research is an independent, non-profit biomedical research institution dedicated to advancing the frontiers of scientific knowledge in life sciences and medicine, and providing the foundation for tomorrow’s innovative therapies. With faculty and staff of over 800 researchers in La Jolla, California and Lake Nona, Florida, the Institute ranks among the world’s top 20 research organizations for the impact of its scientists’ publications. We are currently expanding our ‘Hit to Probe’ Medicinal Chemistry efforts in Florida in response to a recent NIH Molecular Library Production Network (MLPCN) comprehensive center award. These positions are located at our new research facility in the Lake Nona/Orlando region of Central Florida and will be under the direction of Dr. Greg Roth. Duties and Responsibilities: For this multi-year project, Burnham seeks talented Synthetic and Medicinal Chemists to join our dynamic, multidisciplinary team of scientists. Research responsibilities will focus on the design and synthesis of molecules for lead discovery and lead optimization, and advancing our discovery programs through the generation of novel molecular probes. Requirements: Ideal candidates must recently have completed a Ph.D. in Synthetic Organic or Medicinal Chemistry and a demonstrated track record in synthetic problem solving. Priority will be given to highly motivated, new Ph.D.'s and Postdoctoral Associates with experience in heterocyclic chemistry and/or multi-step synthetic problem solving. Ideally, candidates should have the ability to interpret initial high throughput screening data sets, derive structure activity relationships, expected to become familiar with using available cheminformatic and structural information to design relevant targeted compounds, and be versed in current methods of streamlined parallel and automated synthesis. The successful applicant will have demonstrated a high level of productivity as evidenced by publication record and letters of recommendation. Excellent written and oral communication, interpersonal skills, and strong computer skills are essential. Extensive experience in organic synthesis with good working knowledge of analytical methods including NMR, HPLC, and preparative LC-MS separations is highly desired. Successful candidates must also be able to work within an interdisciplinary team. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package aligned with current NIH guidelines. For consideration, qualified, interested candidates should forward a cover letter, resume, at least 2 references/recommendation letters, and Research Accomplishment/Interest Summary as a single PDF or Word document to groth@burnham.org.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON SEPTEMBER 2nd, 2008.