Chemistry Newsletter - 05/09/2005

 


University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter



XXIX - No. 18 May 9th, 2005

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Marty Zanni has won the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

 

We are delighted to report that Marty Zanni has won the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for Excellence in Teaching of Future Engineers. This award is presented by the UW School of Engineering, and in Marty's case the award is for his outstanding teaching in Chem 109. This is the first time this award has been won by an assistant professor. Congratulations Marty!

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Laura Kiessling Named Editor For New ACS Journal

Professor Laura L. Kiessling has been named the first editor of the American Chemical Society's new journal on the chemistry-biology interface, ACS Chemical Biology. "Laura Kiessling's advocacy for this field and her vision of its future make her the ideal candidate to lead the ACS's efforts to serve chemical biologists as they expand the frontiers of science," says ACS Senior Product Development Manager Jennifer Cho. "We fully expect her editorship of ACS Chemical Biology to usher in a new beginning for the society at the chemistry-biology interface." Congratulations to Laura for this signal honor!

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Summer Hours

The Chemistry Newsletter will be going to Bi-weekly publication starting with next week. Please continue to drop/send material for the newsletter to me. We will publish the newsletter on the off week for special announcements. Thank You.

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department/Executive Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 9341 Chemistry

5/10/05

Finance Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 1130

5/17/05

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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, May 10th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Virginia Cornish, Columbia University.

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Wednesday, May 11th, 2005 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Daniel Gamelin, University of Washington-Seattle. “Oxide Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors: From Nanocrystals to Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism”

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Thursday, May 12th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Grant Geske, Blackwell Group.

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Thursday, May 19th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Melissa Boersma, Belshaw Group.

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Friday, June 3rd - 4th, 2005 - Organic Seminar, - Room 1315 Chemistry. The Nelsen 65th Birthday Symposium, June 3-5, 2005. Visit the web site for details: http://www.hsc.wvu.edu/sop/compchem/sfn_65th/nelsen.html.

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Analytical Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://analytical.chem.wisc.edu/analytical/writings/Seminars/spring2005.html.

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Physical Chemistry Student Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://www.chem.wisc.edu/physical/Home.html.

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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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Murray JK. Gellman SH.

Application of microwave irradiation to the synthesis of 14-helical beta-peptides.

Organic Letters. 7(8):1517-1520, 2005 Apr 14.

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Gorske BC. Jewell SA. Guerard EJ. Blackwell HE.

Expedient synthesis and design strategies for new peptoid construction.

Organic Letters. 7(8):1521-1524, 2005 Apr 14.

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Clark TP. Landis CR. Freed SL. Klosin J. Abboud KA.

Highly active, regioselective, and enantioselective hydroformylation with Rh catalysts ligated by bis-3,4-diazaphospholanes.

Journal of the American Chemical Society. 127(14):5040-5042, 2005 Apr 13.

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Fiedler AT. Bryngelson PA. Maroney MJ. Brunold TC.

Spectroscopic and computational studies of Ni superoxide dismutase: Electronic structure contributions to enzymatic function.

Journal of the American Chemical Society. 127(15):5449-5462, 2005 Apr 20.

 

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Payne AC. deProphetis WA. Ellis AB. Derenne TG. Zenner GM. Crone WC.

Communicating science to the public through a university-museum partnership.

Journal of Chemical Education. 82(5):743-750, 2005 May.

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Bentley AK. Farhoud M. Ellis AB. Lisensky GC. Nickel AML. Crone WC.

Template synthesis and magnetic manipulation of nickel nanowires.

Journal of Chemical Education. 82(5):765-768, 2005 May.

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Binkowski BF. Richmond KE. Kaysen J. Sussman MR. Belshaw PJ.

Correcting errors in synthetic DNA through consensus shuffling - art. no. e55.

Nucleic Acids Research. 33(6):E55, 2005.

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Beck JD. Shang L. Marcus MS. Hamers RJ.

Manipulation and real-time electrical detection of individual bacterial cells at electrode junctions: A model for assembly of nanoscale biosystems.

Nano Letters. 5(4):777-781, 2005 Apr.

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Yi CS. Yun SY. Guzei IA.

Catalytic synthesis of tricyclic quinoline derivatives from the regioselective hydroamination and C-H bond activation reaction of benzocyclic amines and alkynes.

Journal of the American Chemical Society. 127(16):5782-5783, 2005 Apr 27.

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Guzei IA. Li KL. Darkwa J.

Conformational studies of 1-4-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazolyl-1-carbonyl)benzene.

Journal of Chemical Crystallography. 35(3):197-202, 2005 Mar.

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Chen Y. Shortreed MR. Olivier M. Smith LM.

Parallel single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by surface invasive cleavage with universal detection.

Analytical Chemistry. 77(8):2400-2405, 2005 Apr 15.

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Copyright © 2005 Thomson ISI

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National Organic Chemistry Symposium

We are writing to enlist your help in encouraging all of the students and/or postdoctoral fellows that you know to register for the upcoming National Organic Chemistry Symposium to be held June 12-16 at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. As there will be a healthy mix of individuals from all areas of organic chemistry present, the poster sessions and lectures at this years conference promise to be exciting and thought provoking. In addition, Salt Lake City and the University of Utah will serve as spectacular venues for this year’s events. Perhaps best of all is the price: this conference continues to be one of the best deals out there, particularly for students. Registration for students is only $60, post docs $85. Housing is still available in the recently remodeled (for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games) residence halls for only $30.00 per night for a single, $22 per night for a double. A meal plan for the week (which covers all meals from Sunday evening through Thursday lunch) is only $67. Students can do the entire conference (registration, lodging, and food) for as little as $215 for the week!! Again, please encourage any and all students to register at: http://conferences.utah.edu/nos2005 . This promises to be a fantastic conference. Ahmed Abdel-Magid and Jon Rainier NOS Conference Committee.

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COURSES IN ATOMISTIC MODELING

 

Two new courses on atomic scale modeling methods will be offered this fall 2005 by the Materials Science and Engineering Department.  The first course (MSE401) is an introduction to basic methods for the beginner, while the second one (MSE803) will teach advanced skills for those wanting to perform cutting edge modeling research. MSE401 is not required for those who want to take MSE803. The courses may be of value to those with both theory and experimental interests from chemistry, physics, biology, materials science, and other fields. Please forward this message to anyone who might be interested. Please contact either Dane Morgan: ddmorgan@wisc.edu, 244 MSE, 608-265-5879 or Izabela Szlufarska: izabela@engr.wisc.edu, 242 MSE, 608-234-2622 for further information.  We hope you will come join us in learning this exciting and rapidly growing field.

For beginners interested in learning more about modeling …

MSE 401 Special Topics: Introduction to Atomistic Modeling.

Level: Upper level undergraduate / Graduate.

Location and Time: 330 Mechanical Eng., 2:30-3:45 TR.

Instructor: Prof. Dane Morgan (ddmorgan@wisc.edu, 244 MSE, 608-265-5879).

Textbooks: (will be available in the library).

"Molecular Modeling. Principles and Applications" A. R. Leach.

Course Objective:

This course will provide an introduction to the ideas and standard methods of atomistic modeling that are used in nanoscience, materials simulation, polymer physics, biology, and many other fields.  The course will cover basic aspects of quantum mechanical methods, interatomic potentials, numerical techniques, Monte Carlo, and molecular dynamics. Background information in statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and relevant physics will be reviewed. Students will explore ideas through use of state of the art modeling software as well as writing their own codes in Matlab. The course will culminate with a final project.  Prerequisites include basic statistical mechanics/thermodynamics (e.g., MSE330, PHYS415 or equivalent) or physical chemistry (e.g., CHEM561 or equivalent) and elementary modern physics (e.g., PHYS 205, 241, 244 or equivalent), or permission of instructor.  Programming experience is not required.

For graduate students interested in using molecular simulation for research …

MSE 803 Special Topics: Advanced Molecular Simulations

(listed as Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Materials in the printed Timetable)

Level: Graduate

Location and Time: 275 MSE, 9:30-10:45 TR

Instructor: Prof. Izabela Szlufarska (izabela@engr.wisc.edu, 242 MSE, 608-234-2622)

Textbooks: (will be available in the library)

"Computer Simulations of Liquids", M.P. Allen, D. J. Tildesley

"Understanding Molecular Simulation. From Algorithms to Applications", D. Frenkel, B. Smit

Course Objective:

This course will focus on state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations methods and their applications to nanoparticles, solids, and liquids. The course will include a simulation project, which will give students hands-on experience in modeling and parallel computing. This project can be part of a student’s ongoing graduate research. Throughout the semester students will learn advanced simulation techniques in various statistical ensembles: treatment of long-range interactions, accelerated molecular dynamics, on-the-fly optimizations, simulations of diffusion and other “rare” events, and computation of structural, dynamical, and transport properties of simple materials.  It is an advanced course, however prior knowledge of MD and MC is not required. Basic knowledge of statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and physics / materials science is preferred, but will be reviewed at the beginning of the semester. Familiarity with C or Fortran is strongly encouraged.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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None For This Newsletter

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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Assistant Professor of Chemistry: Arkansas Tech University, seeks applications for a tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level to begin August 2005. Candidates must hold a PhD in Chemistry or Chemistry Education. Teaching duties include undergraduate general chemistry courses and some organic chemistry. Send letter of application, teaching philosophy, plans for involving undergraduates in research, curriculum vita, official transcripts, andthree letters of recommendation to: `Dr. Richard Cohoon, Dean, School of Physical and Life Sciences, Arkansas Tech University, 1701 N. Boulder Ave., Russdiville, AR 72801-2222. Closing date is June 17, 2005 or until filled. Details at: http://pls.atu.edu/physci/.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AND/OR JOBS

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Roseanne J. Sension is currently seeking two Postdoctoral Fellows for positions in her laboratory at the University of Michigan. One of these positions is for a traditional research Postdoctoral Fellow. The second position is in conjunction with a Dual Mentorship Research-Teaching Postdoctoral Program that we have implemented at Michigan. Her group is currently involved in two specific areas of research. First, we are developing methods to use phase and amplitude shaping of ultrashort optical pulses to control condensed phase molecular dynamics and simple chemical reactions. This is a collaborative project supported by the FOCUS center at the University of Michigan. FOCUS is an NSF funded Physics Frontier Center devoted to extending the frontiers in optical, coherent, and ultrafast science. The center contains a wide variety of instrumentation and expertise in optical science and technology, bringing together scientists in a diversity of disciplines including chemistry, biophysics, physics, and electrical engineering. In the second project state-of-the-art femtosecond to nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques are used to study reaction mechanism in biological systems. One such project is focused on investigating the reaction mechanism in B12 dependent enzymes using a combination of time-resolved optical spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations, and steady state x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and EXAFS) in collaboration with Professor Penner-Hahn. The traditional research Postdoctoral Fellow could work on either or both of these projects. The Dual-Mentorship Postdoctoral Fellow would spend between 50% and 75% of his/her time on one of the research projects outlined above. The remaining effort would be directed toward scholarly teaching and would include a teaching assignment and involvement in our on-going effort to develop and improve the undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum. The teaching activity will provide an opportunity for the candidate to engage in four aspects of instruction: course design, implementation, documentation, and assessment. The Dual-Mentorship program is particularly addressed toward students with interest in University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 N. University, Ann Arbor MI 48109-1055, careers at primarily undergraduate institutions. Please contact me directly by phone (734-763-6074) or by e-mail rsension@umich.edu for more details. Roseanne J. Sension, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physics.

 

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University of Rochester. Pat Holland has at least one opening for a chemist who is excited to work on the border of organometallic chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. His group largely focuses on the chemistry of low-coordinate iron complexes, in an effort to gain insight into the mechanism of nitrogenase. This leads to interesting coordination chemistry and organometallic chemistry (very reactive 12-electron complexes), and interesting bioinorganic chemistry (the mechanism of nitrogenase is one of the great mysteries in the field). A position in my group is ideal for an organometallic chemist who wants to broaden their knowledge by learning about biochemistry and spectroscopy while continuing to practice synthetic chemistry, and also great for a bioinorganic chemist who wants to work with especially exciting synthetic model compounds. The ideal candidate will have experience in synthesis of air-sensitive compounds, and an desire to study the mechanism of reactions in synthetic compounds and enzymes. We would also welcome a well-trained computational chemist or spectroscopist who wants to look in depth at our compounds. More information on my research group may be found at: http://hollandimac.chem.rochester.edu and a recent review of our nitrogenase-inspired work is at: http://pubs.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/cgi-bin/rp/rp2_abst_e?cjc_v05-005_83_ns_nf_cjc4-05. Interested applicants should contact me by email: holland@chem.rochester.edu, with a C.V. and three references. Send to: Pat Holland, Assistant Professor, phone: 585-273-3092, Department of Chemistry lab phone: 585-275-8161, University of Rochester FAX: 585-276-0205, Rochester, NY 14627-0216, e-mail: holland@chem.rochester.edu. Website: http://hollandimac.chem.rochester.edu/.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON MAY 23rd, 2005.