Chemistry Newsletter - 04/03/2000

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University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter

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XXXV No. 14 April 3rd, 2000

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Inorganic Chemistry Cumulative Exam Schedule, 2000

All cumes are in room 2373 from 9 am to noon.

***PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE***

April 22nd

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Finance Committee Meetings

The following dates have been confirmed for the Finance Committee Meetings this spring.

All of the meetings will be held on Tuesday from 1:20 to 3:30 PM

April 4 April 25
May 23

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SEMINARS

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Monday, April 3rd, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Kenneth Suslick, University of Illinois.

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Charles Parmenter, Indiana University. "Intra-and Intermolecular Dynamics of Molecules with Internal Rotation"

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2000 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 3:55 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Julia S. Higgins, Imperial College, London. "The Effect of Flow on Mixing and Demixing of Polymers"

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Thursday, April 6th, 2000 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. David Preston, Graduate Student, U. W. - Madison. "Mass Spectrometry and Large Ion Detection Efficiency"

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Thursday, April 6th, 2000 - Chemical Education Seminar, 4:00 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Jane Snell Copes, Science Museum of Minnesota. "What Do You DO In A Science Museum"

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Thursday, April 6th, 2000 - CBI - Highlights Seminar, 11a.m., Room 1361, Chemistry Building. Professor Brent Stockwell, MIT-Whitehead Institute. "Forward and Reverse Chemical Genetics"

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***CANCELED*** - Monday, April 10th, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Du Shriver, Northwestern University.

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Monday, April 10th, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Dr. David Devore.

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Tuesday, April 11st, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Dor Ben-Amotz, Purdue University. "Measurement and Modeling of Solvation Forces and Fluctuations"

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Tuesday, April 11th, 2000 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 3:55 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Bernhard Rieger, University of Ulm, Germany. "The Design of Thermoplastic Elastomers by Transition Metal Catalysis"

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Thursday, April 13th, 2000 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Manchun Lu, Graduate Student, U.W. - Madison. "Massively Parallel Genotyping On Surfaces"

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Thursday, April 13th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Matthew Bursavich, Graduate Student.

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Thursday, April 13th, 2000 - Highlights Lectures, 2:25 p.m., Room 3335 Sterling. Silvia Cavagnero, UW Madison.

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Monday, April 17th, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Mahdi Abu-Omar, University of California-Los Angeles.

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Tuesday, April 18th, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Lewis Rothberg, University of Rochester. "Making Light of Polymers"

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Tuesday, April 18th, 2000 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 3:55 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota. "Block Copolymers - Designer Soft Materials"

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Tuesday, April 18th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Department. Professor David Beebe, Department Biomedical Engineering. "Microfluidic Systems for Biology: Is Microfluidics Useful to Biologists? What Class of Biological Questions Can Microfluidic Systems Address? What Obstacles Must be Overcome First?"

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Wednesday, April 19th, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Bob Bedard, UOP.

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Thursday, April 20th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Andrew Hawk, Graduate Student.

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Thursday, April 20th, 2000 - Highlights Lecture, 2:25 p.m., Room 3335 Sterling. TBA.

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Monday, April 24thd, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Tobin Marks, 3M McElvain Speaker.

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Tuesday, April 25th, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Irina Shkel, UW-Madison. "Salt Control of DNA Oligomer Binding in Technological Applications"

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Tuesday, April 25th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Professor John R. Scheffer, UBC-Vancouver. "In The Footsteps of Pasteur: Asymmetric Induction in the Photochemistry of Crystalline Ammonium Carboxylate Salts"

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Thursday, April 27th, 2000 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Ned Seeman (Analy Sci/Mat Sci), New York University. "DNA Nanotechnology"

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Thursday, April 27th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Byron Griffith, Graduate Student.

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Thursday, April 27th, 2000 - Highlights Lecture, 2:25 p.m., Room 3335 Sterling. Professor Meyer Jackson.

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Monday, May 1st, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Debra Rolison, Naval Research Laboratory - Joint with Analytical.

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Tuesday, May 2nd, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Dana Dlott, University of Illinois. "Vibrational Energy Relaxation in Liquids Studied by Ultrafast Two-Dimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy"

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***POSTPONED UNTIL FALL OF THIS YEAR*** Tuesday, May 2nd, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Professor Jumi Shin.

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Wednesday, May 3rd, 2000 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Dr. Jack Douglas, (Analy Sci/ACS), National Institutes of Standards & Technology. "Correlated Motion in a Simulated Supercooled Liquid"

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Wednesday, May 3rd, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Mike Hopkins, The University of Chicago.

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Thursday, May 4th, 2000 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:05 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Dr. Cynthia Jameson.

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Thursday, May 4th, 2000 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 3:55 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Stanley I. Sandler, University of Delaware. "The Use of Computational Chemistry to Predict the Phase Behavior of Complex Systems"

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Thursday, May 4th, 2000 - Organic Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1361 Chemistry Building. Robert Halter, Graduate Student.

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Thursday, May 4th, 2000 - Highlights Lecture, 2:25 p.m., Room 3335 Sterling. Professor Lloyd Smith, UW-Madison Chemistry Department. "DNA Computing on Surfaces"

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Monday, May 8th, 2000 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room B371 Chemistry Building. Michael Fryzuk.

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Tuesday, May 9th, 2000 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. David Grier, University of Chicago. "When Like Charges Attract: Surprises in Macroionic Interactions"

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Tuesday, May 9th, 2000 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 3:55 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Pablo G. Debenedetti, Princeton University. "Towards an Improved Understanding of the Glassy State"

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Thursday, May 11th, 2000 - Highlights Lecture, 2:25 p.m., Room 3335 Sterling. Professor Jeff Johnson, UW-Madison.

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Tuesday, May 16th, 2000 - (McElvain) - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Stanley Williams, Hewlett Packard. "Architectonics of Molecular Computers"

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Thursday, May 18th, and Friday May 19th, 2000 - Frontiers of Genomics IV Symposium, (Thursday 5/18) 1:00 p.m., Genetics/Biotech Center, (Friday 5/19) 8:30 a.m., and 1:30 p.m. Nobel Laureate Walter Gilbert Keynote Speaker. More Information to follow.

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Summer Courses For Graduate Students Interested In Teaching

The College of Letters and Science is pleased to announce the schedule of summer courses for graduate students interested in teaching. For the fourth year, we are offering a variety of classes designed to appeal to graduate students across several disciplines. These short, intensive sessions will help teaching assistants and future faculty members to develop important teaching skills. Although they are housed in individual college departments, the methods and techniques that these sessions explore would be useful to students from a variety of related fields. Students with a graduate assistant ship appointment that earned a tuition remission in the spring semester will also receive a full tuition waiver in summer sessions. Enrollment in the individual courses is limited; early registration is a good idea.

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BOTANY 575: Special Topics: Effective Teaching of Biology. Two credits, June 12-July 2, 8:30-10:30 MTWRF, Professor Wayne Becker, 262-5833. Meets in 350 Birge.

This Course is designed for graduate students in the biological sciences as preparation both for teaching assistantship appointments and for future faculty positions. It will include presentations by distinguished faculty members in the biological sciences, innovative teaching techniques and methodologies; opportunities for students to present and interact with class members, and sensitization to diversity in an academic setting.

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ENGLISH 699: Practicum in Teaching Writing in the Disciplines. One credit, May 22-May 28, time and location TBA. Rebecca Nowacek, 263-2732.

This course is designed for graduate students in all disciplines (especially those outside English) who would like to learn how to use their writing to help students learn course material. The course will focus on and practice creative and practical teaching strategies, including designing writing assignments, using peer review, and responding effectively to student writing.

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HISTORY 978: Practice Teaching. Two credits, May 22-June 11, 8:55-10:55 MTWRF. Professor Stanley Schultz, 263-1814. Meets in 5257 Humanities.

The basics of preparing and presenting a successful undergraduate lecture course are the same across the social sciences' and humanities' course offerings. This course will explore the methods and techniques of teaching an undergraduate lecture course, including the processes of selecting a text, organizing a course, and developing a lecture.

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MATHEMATICS 903: Seminar in Mathematics Education. One to three credits, May 22-June 11, class meets twice every day: 8:30-10:30 and 1:00-2:00 MTWRF. Professor Robert Wilson, 263-5944. Meets in B231 Van Vleck (mornings) and B107 Van Vleck (afternoons).

This course is designed to appeal not only to math students, but to anyone in the physical or social sciences who is interested in using new technologies to help students learn. We will explore the educational potential of computer programs (such as Maple and Matlab) and fancy calculators. Students registering for three credits will develop an instructional unit for a course they might teach, integrating technology in a pedagogically significant way. Students registering for one or two credits will have homework and will be required to attend the morning sessions, but the afternoon lab time will be optional.

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STATISTICS 692: Effective Teaching of Modern Introductory Statistics. One or two credits, June 12-June 25, 1:10-2:25 MTWR. Professor Robert Wardrop, 263-3304. Meets in 1207 Computer Sciences and Statistics.

Professors in many disciplines teach introductory statistics. As a result, graduate students from a variety of departments might find this course to be useful. This course will provide a vision of a modern statistics course and offer suggestions on how to teach it. We will emphasize experimental design, student projects, classroom activities, incorporating writing assignments, computer simulation and data analysis. This course will approach statistics in the context of doing science rather than statistics as a branch of mathematics.

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WOMEN'S STUDIES 720: Women's Studies and Society - Practicum in Teaching Women's Studies. Three Credits, June 12-July 2, 10:20-11:35 MWF. Mimi Orner, 263-1785. Meets in 115 Ingraham.

This course will use the major debates within feminism, cultural studies, and curriculum theory as lenses to examine the complex issues of women's studies teaching. Integrated throughout the course will be readings and discussions that focus on social and cultural difference in education. We will explore how gender dynamics intersect with the dynamics of race, class, sexuality, disability, age, and so on in educational settings.

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The Nature of Nature

An Interdisciplinary Conference on the Role of Naturalism in Science. April 12-15, 2000. The Michael Polanyi Center, Baylor University. Registration information: http://www.baylor.edu/~polanyi/natconf.htm .

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For Industrial Positions, see the Chemistry Career Services Newsletter at:

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http://www.chem.wisc.edu/placement/7news.html


FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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The Department of Chemistry at Rutgers-Newark seeks a Manager of its NMR Facility to operate and maintain the NMR instruments and collaborate with researchers. The manager will be responsible for (1) implementation, development, and teaching of NMR methods for small molecules, macromolecules and biomolecules; (2) upkeep of facility spectrometers (currently Varian 400 and 500 MHz) including maintenance of NMR hardware and software; (3) collaboration with faculty researchers; (4) initiating and assisting in writing proposals to acquire new NMR instruments; (5) identifying potential external users to help support the facility and running samples for both internal and external users. Qualifications: Ph.D. in Chemistry, Biochemistry or Biophysics with experience in maintenance of NMR hardware and software. Candidates should have significant experience in modern multidimensional and heteronuclear methods as well as good communication skills. Send letter/curriculum vitae to: Dr. Ramy Farid, Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, 73 Warren St, Newark, NJ 07102-1811 or fax to (973) 353-1264.

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University of Idaho. The Department of Chemistry will hire a full-time, permanent Analytical Instrumentation Supervisor to provide analytical support for departmental and university research efforts, primarily with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to assist with research training by instructing in the operation and use of equipment and operating software, and to ensure the operational efficiency of the equipment. The departmental NMR facility includes a new Bruker Avance 500MHz with solids and gradient probes, a Varian Gemini 2000 300MHz, and a Bruker 300MHz and 200MHz. This is a new, non-faculty exempt position supervised by the chair of the department. Starting date: July 1, 2000. Provide support for departmental and university research efforts with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by performing analyses on research samples; consulting with faculty, postdoctorals, graduate students, and undergraduate researchers on analytical methodology; and providing spectral interpretations. Support the department's research training efforts by assisting in the instruction of faculty, postdoctorals, graduate students, and undergraduate researchers in the operation and general use of NMR equipment and operating software; preparing samples; and processing extraordinary samples. Ensure the operational efficiency of the department's NMR spectrometers, with the assistance of the department's technical staff, by performing routine maintenance tasks (e.g., filling with cryogens, tuning to standards, and maintaining the air dryer systems); scheduling; managing the data files and authorizations; upgrading software as needed; troubleshooting when the equipment malfunctions; assuring proper instrument operating environments; communicating with factory representatives as appropriate; maintaining use and repair records and preparing customer billings; maintaining good knowledge of equipment, operating systems, and current methods and practices; coordinating delivery and installation of new instruments; and writing condensed operation manuals for users. In the absence of the other departmental technical personnel, assist with responsibilities associated with use and maintenance of the department's mass spectrometer and other equipment, such as infrared, UVvisible, fluorescence, and atomic absorption spectrometers and gas, liquid, and ion chromatography. Ph.D. in chemistry or related field (or comparable knowledge of and experience with NMR spectrometry), with emphasis and experience in spectrometric analytical methods and procedures; specialized knowledge of NMR theory and applications; knowledge of mass spectrometry and IR theory and applications; considerable knowledge of and demonstrated ability in using computerized operating systems for analytical equipment; demonstrated ability in timely and efficient instrumentation troubleshooting; excellent oral and written communication skills; demonstrated ability to explain and instruct, both orally to individuals or groups and in writing, the theory and application of analytical research instrumentation; demonstrated ability to work effectively and equitably with individuals of varying educational and cultural backgrounds. Knowledge of and ability to maintain, troubleshoot, and develop experiments on other analytical research instrumentation, such as atomic absorption, fluorescence, and UV-visible spectrometers and gas, liquid. and ion chromatographs. Submit the following four items by the application deadline: (1) letter of intent, (2) resume, (3) names, addresses, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of three professional references, and (4) written responses to request for supplemental information. Contact for more information: Dr. Jean'ne M. Shreeve, Search Committee Chair Department of Chemistry University of Idaho Moscow ID BS844-2343 phone: 208-885-6552 fax: 208-885-6173. Closing date for applications: The search will close when a sufficient number of qualified applicants has been identified but not before April 28, 2000.

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Hamilton College. Candidates are sought to fill a three-year position in Chemistry at the Assistant Professor level. The ideal candidate will have a Ph.D. in Chemistry or Biochemistry, with expertise in biophysical, bioinorganic, bioorganic and/or enzymology, and a strong commitment to teaching and conducting research with undergraduates. Teaching responsibilities include teaching Biological Chemistry and General Chemistry (lectures and laboratories). Research with undergraduates is expected, and the College will provide start-up support. This is an excellent opportunity for the right candidate to learn how to be successful as a teacher/scholar in a liberal arts college setting. Interested candidates should send a current resume, a statement of research and teaching interests, copies of transcripts, and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to: Professor Tim Elgren, Department of Chemistry. Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323-1292. Review of applications will start April 14. 2000 and continue until the position is filled. For more information, visit our web site at http://www.chem.hamilton.edu .

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The Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, University of Illinois at Chicago, has an opening for a Senior Research Specialist in the Pharmaceutical Sciences, with a secondary Research Assistant Professor appointment available to an appropriately qualified individual. This is a career-track, non-tenure position to manage and maintain the Departmental NMR laboratory and provide systems management expertise for Departmental Unix and Linux computers. This laboratory manager will provide technical and administrative supervision; maintain and oversee facility operation; train, assist and advise graduate students and postdoctoral staff in the use of the NMR equipment; consult with users on experimental design and data interpretation; perform record keeping and billing of users. Involvement in collaborative research with faculty with diverse interests in synthetic and natural product chemistry, structure analysis and computational chemistry is strongly encouraged. The NMR facility includes a Bruker DPX300 spectrometer and access to DRX500 and DRX600 spectrometers. The duties will also include maintenance, troubleshooting and upgrading SGI and Linux workstations and software installations. Limited teaching of graduate level NMR spectroscopy will also be required. The candidate should have a Ph.D. degree in chemistry or related area; should be proficient in UNIX or Linux-based computer systems management and NMR instrumentation troubleshooting; and have excellent interpersonal skills. Candidates should submit a letter of application (including reference address, telephone number and e-mail address), CV, and request that three letters of reference be sent to: Chair, NMR Search Committee, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy (m/c 781), University of Illinois at Chicago, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612.

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A NMR Postdoctoral position is available in the Chemistry Department at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C. This position will combine day-to-day operation of the departmental NMR facility with the opportunity to teach a NMR spectroscopy course. The position is available immediately. The NMR facility is equipped with 2 newly installed (1999) Bruker AVANCE shielded NMR systems consisting of a 3 channel 500MHz spectrometer with z-axis gradients, TBI and BBO probes and VT capability as well as a 300MHz system with a quad probe. The NMR portion of the position involves working with the Instrument Manager on routine maintenance of the NMR spectrometers, training students on the use of instrumentation, implementing new experiments, collaborating with research faculty on NMR experiments and maintaining the SGI workstations in the facility. The successful candidate should have a Ph.D. in Chemistry with considerable experience in NMR instrumentation and methods including multidimensional, heteronuclear experiments. Experience with Bruker software, Felix and unix system administration is desirable but not required. The term for the postdoctoral position is 1 year renewable upon mutual consent. Candidates should send a CV, three letters of reference and a 1-2 page statement of research experience and professional goals to: Professor Mark Welker, Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7486, (336)758-5758, (336)758-4656 (Fax), welker@wfu.edu , (inquiries).

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The Chemistry Department at the University of New Mexico is seeking applicants for a one-year faculty appointment at the assistant professor level. The primary duty expected of the candidate is to teach one course per semester selected from the regularly scheduled analytical offerings. Secondarily, the candidate's would be expected to carry out collaborative research with one of the current chemistry faculty. A PhD in Chemistry, completed no later than July 31, 2000, with a background in analytical methodology is required. Experience in classroom or laboratory instruction, or potential for effective teaching, and collegiality; Post-doctoral training and promise of scholarship are preferred. For consideration, applications must be received no later than May 5, 2000. Please send letters of interest, vitae, and a brief statement of teaching qualification and interests and at least three letters of recommendation to: Analytical Search Committee, Department of Chemistry, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.

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Chemistry Instructor. Marmion Academy is a day and residential Catholic college-preparatory high school for boys. Its educational objective is to educate the whole man by establishing a climate conducive to spiritual growth and intellectual endeavors. The Academy advocates and promotes a Catholic philosophy of life, attempts to create a Christian atmosphere in the school, and teaches a Christian value system. All staff members are expected to play an integral part in creating and maintaining a Christian atmosphere and in promoting Christian values. The Chemistry Instructor will be expected to teach chemistry and advanced placement chemistry. Requirements: Bachelor's degree in the field. Master's preferred. Salary: $26,000 base, with increments for credentials and years of experience. Benefits: Health and Life Insurance, Retirement Plan, Half remuneration for graduate study, Tuition for sons of faculty. Applicants are required to mail a resume along with three letters of reference to: Paul Barton, Director of Personnel, Marmion Academy, 1000 Butterfield Road, Aurora, Illinois 60504-9742, Phone: (630) 897-6936, FAX: (630) 897-7086, Email: pbarton@marmion.pvt.k12.il.us .

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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The Internet Scout Project is looking for a PA - to start in May. Position Title: Editor for the Physical Sciences, Scout Report for Science and Engineering Location: Internet Scout Project, Computer Sciences, L&S. The Project Assistant will be a part of the Internet Scout Project: http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/, http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/ in the Computer Sciences Department, funded under a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goal of the Internet Scout Project is to promote effective use of the Internet by researchers and educators in the U.S. by providing them with information about high-quality electronic resources. For more information about the project, see our Website, send email, or call 262-6607. The Project Assistant will work with the Editor for the Life Sciences to create the biweekly Scout Report for Science and Engineering, http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/sci-engr/index.html, http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/sci-engr/index.html , to be delivered via email and the World Wide Web. Appointment: 50%, 20 hours per week. Appointment begins in May (date negotiable). Application deadline April 20. Degree and Area of Specialization 1.Graduate Student in the physical sciences, computer science or engineering. Must be a registered graduate student to be hired. Relevant Experience 1. Good general knowledge of physical sciences (e.g., physics, chemistry, mathematics, geology, engineering). 2. Very good writing skills (English). 3. Knowledge of and experience working with resource discovery methods in the Internet environment. 4. Knowledge of and experience working with quality resources on the Internet related to the physical sciences and/or engineering. Duties 1. Research the Internet for electronic resources and tools in the fields of the physical sciences and engineering. Filter out the resources that are most useful to the university-level research and education community, using a pre-established list of criteria. Work with the Editor for the Life Sciences and other team members to update these criteria as needed. 2. Write, edit, and organize information about these resources into brief summaries. These summaries form the basis for the Scout Report for Science & Engineering. 3. Work with the Editor for the Life Sciences to combine the summaries into a biweekly Scout Report for Science and Engineering to be distributed electronically to researchers and educators via email and the World Wide Web. 4. Additional duties may include assisting with the maintenance of the Scout Report mailing lists or miscellaneous administrative tasks. 5. Support the goals of the Internet Scout Project in the Computer Sciences Department, in promoting effective use of the Internet by researchers and educators in the U.S. Send cover letter and resume to: Travis Koplow, Managing Editor, Internet Scout Project, 1210 Computer Sciences, koplow@cs.wisc.edu , 262-6607.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AND/OR JOBS

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University of Missouri. A postdoctoral position, initially for one year and may be renewed, is available in the research group of Dr. Tuck Wong to study the partition, structure and dynamics of peptides in membrane mimics, and peptide-macromolecule interactions by combined NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit membrane systems. For representative publications see: T. Wymore and T. C. Wong, "Molecular Dynamics Study of Substance P Peptides Partitioned in an Sodium Dodecylsulfate Micelle", Biophysical J. 1999, 76, 1213-1227. Xinfeng Gao and T. C. Wong, " Studies of the Partitioning and the Structure of Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) Peptides in Membrane Mimics by Two-dimensional NMR and Pulsed Field Gradient Diffusion", Biophysical J. 1998, 74, 1871 - 1888. Spectrometers at 300 and 500 MHz (Bruker DRX) are available for NMR studies. A 600 MHz spectrometer is expected to be purchased in the coming year. MD simulation (using CHARMM and AMBER) is carried out on supercomputers at the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center. The starting date is August 1, 2000 or shortly after. Applications are invited from candidates with a Ph. D. degree and prior experience in multidimensional NMR and/or molecular dynamics simulation. A candidate familiar with both aspects of the research is preferred. Please forward your application (CV/publications and names of 2/3 references) by letter, fax or e-mail to: Professor Tuck C. Wong, Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, E-mail: wongt@missouri.edu, Web page: http://www.chem.missouri.edu/wong/ , Tel: 573 882 7725, Fax:573 882 2754.

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Professor Ian P. Rothwell of Purdue University has a postdoctoral position available in his laboratory for the application of chiral aryloxides to catalytic hydrogenation and carbon-carbon bond forming processes. Strong skills in organometallic synthesis and manipulation of air/moisture sensitive compounds are required The position is available immediately, but I am also very interested in hearing from strong candidates who expect to be available later this year. Further details about the position can be obtained from me via e-mail, phone or send to: Ian P. Rothwell, Professor of Chemistry, Purdue University, Department of Chemistry, 1393 Brown Building, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393, Phone: (765) 494-7012, Fax: (765) 494-0239, e-mail: rothwell@purdue.edu , http://www.chem.purdue.edu/faculty/rothwell/index.html .

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A post-doctoral position will be available beginning in May, 2000 in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The project involves synthesis and photophysical characterization of polymeric materials for use in sensor applications. Candidates should have familiarity with synthetic methods, including some experience with inert atmosphere synthesis. Experience in polymer chemistry is desired. Extensive experience in steady-state fluorescence methods is required. Interested candidates should send a letter and CV to: Dr. Lisa Kelly, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250. Applications and inquiries can also be sent by e-mail: lkelly@umbc.edu .

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1380.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON APRIL 10th, 2000.