Chemistry Newsletter - 03/13/2006

 


University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter



XXX - No. 11 March 13th, 2006

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Irving Shain Chemistry Research Tower Dedication

The Irving Shain Chemistry Research Tower dedication celebrations will be held on Friday May 5th and Saturday May 6th, 2006. All are invited to an exciting weekend of science and celebration. For more information on these celebrations and other activities, please go the Chemistry Home page at: http://www.chem.wisc.edu and click on the Quick link for the Irving Shain Research Tower Dedication link.

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department/Executive Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 9341 Chemistry

3/21/06

4/11/06

5/9/06

Finance Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 1130

4/4/06

4/25/06

5/2/06

5/16/06

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SEMINARS

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Monday, March 20th, 2006 - Ferry Lectures in Macromolecular Science, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christopher M. Dobson, Cambridge University, UK. “Protein Misfolding and Disease: From Theory to Therapy”

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Monday, March 20th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Frank Slack. “Roles for MicroRNA’s in Development and Disease”

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Tuesday, March 21st, 2006 - Ferry Lectures in Macromolecular Science, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Christopher M. Dobson, Cambridge University, UK. “Protein Structure and Folding: From Random Coils to Native States”

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Tuesday, March 21st, 2006 - Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy Seminar, 7:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Brian Schwartz, City University of New York. “Science as Performance: A Proactive Strategy to Communicate and Educate Through Theater, Music, and Dance”

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Tuesday, March 21st, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor David M. Walba, University of Colorado. “High Throughput Measurement of ee Using Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals”

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Thursday, March 23rd, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. David Fahey, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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Thursday, March 23rd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Jamie Ellis, Cavagnero Group.

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Monday, March 27th, 2006 - Theoretical Chemistry Institute Seminar, 3:30 pm, Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor Michael Feig, Michigan State University. “Computer Simulations of Biomolecules in Complex Cellular Environments.”

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Monday, March 27th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. R. Lance Wells. “Intracellular Glycosylation and Insulin Signaling”

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Wednesday Thru Friday, March 29th - 31st, 2006 - Meloche Lectures, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Stephen Lippard, MIT.

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Thursday, March 30th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Ryan Hilger, Graduate Student, Smith Group.

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Thursday, March 30th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Bin Sun, Lynn Group.

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Friday, March 31st, 2006 - Department Colloquium, 4:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Stephen J. Lippard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Monday, April 3rd, 2006 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Patrick Holland, University of Rochester.

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Monday, April 3rd, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Gail Bishop. “TRAF’s and Their Receptors - Cooperation and Competition”

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Mark A. Johnson, Yale University. “Electrons on the Rocks: Molecular Aspects of Electron Hydration Through Cluster Spectroscopy”

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Tuesday, April 4th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor D. Tyler McQuade, Cornell University. “Microreactors, Encapsulated Catalysts, and Mechanisms: New Tools and Techniques for Polymer and Small Molecule Synthesis”

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Wednesday, April 5th, 2006 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Oleg Ozerov, Brandeis University.

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Thursday, April 6th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center. “Novel One-Dimensional Nanostructures and Their Applications”

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Thursday, April 6th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kevin Schultz, Nelsen Group.

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Monday, April 10th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Jeffrey Friedman. “Leptin and the Biologic Basics of Obesity”

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Tuesday, April 11th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Sanat Kumar, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “Minimal Models for Modeling Protein Crystallization”

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Tuesday, April 11th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dan O’Leary, Pomona College. “Deuterium and Tritium NMR Equilibrium Isotope Effects Involving OH/OH and CH/N Hydrogen Bonds: Stereochemical Applications”

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Wednesday, April 12th, 2006 - Merck Lectures, a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Steven Ley, University of Cambridge, UK.

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Thursday, April 13th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Scott A. McLuckey, Purdue University.

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Thursday, April 13th, 2006 - Merck Lectures, a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Steven Ley, University of Cambridge, UK.

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Monday, April 17th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Kathleen Gould. “Split Decisions: Lessons About Cytokinesis from Fission Yeast”

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Tuesday, April 18th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor H. Jane Dyson, The Scripps Research Institute. “New Insights from NMR into Unfolded Proteins and the Protein Folding Process”

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Thursday, April 18th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Virginia W. Cornish, Columbia University. “Co-Opting Nature's Machineries for Chemical Discovery”

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Thursday, April 20th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Antonio J. Ricco, Stanford University.

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Monday, April 24th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Michael Mossing. “Slow Folding and Assembly of Cro Dimers: Implications for the Lambda Genetic Switch”

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Tuesday, April 25th, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Michael J. Saxton, University of California at Davis. “A biological interpretation of anomalous subdiffusion”

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Thursday, April25th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Matt Sigman, University of Utah.

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Thursday, April 27th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Daniel Murphy, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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Thursday, April 27th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jon Tunge, University of Kansas.

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Monday, May 1st, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. I. Robert Lehman. “TBA”

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Tuesday, May 2nd, 2006 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kenneth Jordan, University of Pittsburgh. “Electron and Proton Localization in Water Clusters”

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Tuesday, May 2nd, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Peter Stang, University of Utah. “Nanoscale Molecular Architecture: Design and Self-Assembly of Metallocyclic Polygons and Polyhedra via Coordination”

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Thursday, May 4th, 2006 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Peidong Yang, University of California-Berkeley.

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Thursday, May 4th, 2006 - McElvain Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Suzanne Walker, Harvard University.

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Monday, May 8th, 2006 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry Auditorium. Kevin Struhl. “Logic and Mechanisms of Transcriptional Regulation”

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Thursday, May 11th, 2006 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jeff Johnston, Indiana University.

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Physical Chemistry Student Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://www.chem.wisc.edu/physical/Home.html.

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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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Kontur WS. Saecker RM. Davis CA. Capp MW. Record MT.

Solute probes of conformational changes in open complex (RPo) formation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase at the lambda PR promoter: Evidence for unmasking of the active site in the isomerization step and for large-scale coupled folding in the subsequent conversion to RPo.

Biochemistry. 45(7):2161-2177, 2006 Feb 21.

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Casey CP. Bikzhanova GA. Guzei IA.

Stereochemistry of imine reduction by a hydroxycyclopentadienyl ruthenium hydride.

Journal of the American Chemical Society. 128(7):2286-2293, 2006 Feb 22.

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Copyright © 2006 Thomson ISI

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Covance Corp. The Pharma/Biotech link to the University of Wisconsin is strong, and to keep as much talent in Wisconsin as we can, we would like you to consider these available positions in Madison. We can use multiples for each position. We are also offering any graduates or alumni available for employment prior to April 17th a $500.00 signing bonus. More information can be found at the Covance website: http://www.covance.com. Interested parties should be directed to Amy at (608)-204-6286. Additional information available in Room 1146 Chemistry Building,

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NSF Notices and Information

Please forward this information to all interested persons. If you have further questions, please contact a CHE program officer, http://www.nsf.gov/staff/staff_list.jsp?org=CHE.

Chemistry Research Instrumentation and Facilities: Departmental Multi-User Instrumentation (CRIF:MU) (NSF 05-578). URL: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf05578. Full Proposal Deadline: June 26, 2006 (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time). The Chemistry Research Instrumentation and Facilities Program (CRIF) is structured to enable the National Science Foundation's Division of Chemistry to respond to a variety of needs for infrastructure that promotes research and education in areas traditionally supported by the Division (see the NSF Chemistry Homepage at: http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=CHE). The Departmental Multi-User Instrumentation component of CRIF (CRIF:MU) provides funds to universities, colleges, and consortia thereof for the purchase of multi-user instruments. The maximum request is $500,000 for instrumentation. Additional funds may be requested for personnel who are needed to support cyber-enhanced projects. Important Update: Investigators are reminded that CRIF:MU proposals will only be reviewed if the majority of the research projects described therein are in areas normally supported by the Division of Chemistry. Proposals that are not compliant will be returned without review. The Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI; NSF 05-515) http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf05515) provides funds for instrumentation in all areas of science and engineering supported by NSF.

Cyberinfrastructure Training, Education, Advancement, and Mentoring for Our 21st Century Workforce (CI-TEAM) (NSF 06-548). URL: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf06548. Full Proposal Deadline: June 5, 2006 (due by 5 p.m. submitter's local time). Information technology (IT)-enabled systems, tools, and services have had profound impact on the practice of science and engineering research and education. Integrated to create a national cyberinfrastructure, these systems, tools and services are enabling individuals, groups and organizations to advance science and engineering in ways that revolutionize who can participate, what they can do, and how they do it. To harness the full power of cyberinfrastructure, and the promise it portends for discovery, learning and innovation across and within all areas of science and engineering, requires focused investments in the preparation of a science and engineering workforce with the knowledge and skills needed to create, advance and take advantage of cyberinfrastructure over the long-term. The FY06 expanded CI-TEAM solicitation seeks two types of project proposals, both aimed at the preparation of a diverse, cyberinfrastructure-savvy science and engineering workforce. One type of proposal, the Demonstration Project, is exploratory in nature and may be somewhat limited in scope and scale. Demonstration Projects have the potential to serve as pathfinders to effective larger-scale implementation activities in the future. The other project type, the Implementation Project, is generally larger in scope or scale and draws on prior experience with the activities or the teams proposed. Implementation Projects are expected to deliver sustainable learning and workforce development activities that complement ongoing NSF investment in cyberinfrastructure.

Dear Colleague Letter - Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE) (NSF 06-019). URL: http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf06019. On behalf of the Division of Graduate Education (DGE) in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) we call your attention to an opportunity to request support for research and evaluation projects focused on graduate education. This opportunity is embedded in a new program titled Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE) managed by the Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication (REC) in EHR. The REESE Program Solicitation (NSF 06-537) can be viewed at: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2006/nsf06537/nsf06537.htm. DGE seeks proposals that have the potential to strengthen graduate education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As examples, we encourage proposals that can contribute to our knowledge about how to successfully broaden participation in graduate-level education programs and proposals that investigate new trends and challenges in graduate STEM education. Successful proposals will demonstrate expertise in both the disciplines being studied and research methodology. In principle this can be achieved by selecting a team of co-PIs that bridge knowledge of STEM disciplines with expertise in education research or social science research methods.

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Wisconsin Science Olympiad State Tournament

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is hosting the Wisconsin Science Olympiad State Tournament this spring, and is in need of volunteers. Science Olympiad is a high school team competition in 28 different events that cover most all areas of science, and strives to elevate science education and learning to a level of enthusiasm and support that is normally reserved only for varsity sports programs. Wisconsin Science Olympiad is a non-profit volunteer-based organization which relies on donations of time, money and supplies to generate enthusiasm for science. Its success depends heavily on volunteers for the benefit of elementary, middle, and high school students. College students volunteering for this activity benefit by having evidence of community service for resumes and transcripts. Science community members benefit by having the satisfaction of inspiring young people to aspire to a career in science. All benefit from having a feeling of having been part of an activity that so successfully encourages young people to have fun with math and science. Volunteers are needed to organize and run successful competitions. The 2006 Wisconsin Science Olympiad High School State Competition at the University of Wisconsin – Madison on Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22, has many opportunities for volunteering a half-day and witnessing first hand the excitement and interest that Science Olympiad creates among students from 45 high schools around Wisconsin. Check out the Volunteer Opportunities at: http://so.engr.wisc.edu/state/volunteer.php, and then fill out the Volunteer Registration form. We will be in touch with you regarding your assignment. Your information will not be used for anything other than for our communicating with you about volunteering with the UW-Madison State Science Olympiad Competition.

Thank you, Gary Graper & Van Valaskey. Special Assistants to the Engineering Dean for Young Scientists of America (YSA) Outreach Coordination.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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Abbott Laboratories. Global Pharmaceutical Research and Development. Research Internship for Graduate Student. (1)Evaluate current protocols that have been published in the literature. (2)Set up a HPLC system with a column switching device and chiral detector and develop separations on at least 4 Abbott compounds that have previously had methods developed. The selection of the candidates will vary in polarity and functionality. Selection of HPLC columns will also vary across different types. (3)Compare the published HPLC methods (AR method or other) vs. those obtained through the use of protocol with automation. (4)Write up a guidance protocol for future use. (1)1 week Train and Sign off appropriate procedures; (2)1 week, write general protocol based on literature methods, select compounds/columns for evaluation, set up instrument; (3) 4 weeks - Investigate separations; (4)Write a guidance protocol for HPLC chiral method development.

Abbott Laboratories. Global Pharmaceutical Research and Development. Research Internship for Graduate Student. Objective: The development of a general approach for conducting forced degradation studies for new drug substances and/or drug products. Recognizing that each drug substance /drug product has its own inherent stability toward degradation, a more efficient method for developing stress testing conditions is needed. Current practice in GARD consists of conducting degradation studies by a linear and subjective manual approach to achieve optimum degradation conditions. This project will define a general strategy for the development of degradation studies and incorporate the use of automation with the ReactArray degradation workstation for the parallel evaluation of multiple degradation conditions. Initial efforts will focus on the evaluation of various hydrolysis conditions. Continuing efforts could focus on the evaluation of oxidation and thermal degradation conditions. Ideally, future work would focus on the integrated degradation sample analysis (HPLC/PDA) with the ReactArray workstation.The selected intern will conduct laboratory investigations into identifying a general series of reaction conditions suitable for obtaining 5-10% forced degradation for a given drug substance. The analyst will be responsible for the development of relevant HPLC analysis methods and for the development of reaction conditions to use the ReactArray forced degradation system to automate forced degradation studies. Communication of the research results through both oral and written formats will be required at the conclusion of the internship. Contact: Christopher J. Ciolli, Ph.D., Sr. Process Scientist, Abbott Laboratories, 100 Abbott Park Road, Dept. 04L4, Bldg. AP20, Abbott Park, IL 60064-6016, (847)937-1449 [phone], (847)935-6447 [fax], e-mail: christopher.ciolli@abbott.com.

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NMR Manager Position. An NMR Manager position is available in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Georgia. The NMR Manager will be fully responsible for supervision and maintenance of Varian 400 and 500 MHz instruments in the Chemistry Department, and will share responsibilities for two remote 600 MHz instruments. The manager will be responsible for training users and assist faculty in teaching NMR courses. Additional expectations include assistance with proposal preparation and participation in collaborative research. The position is a non-tenure track academic professional. A Ph. D. in Chemistry or Biochemistry with postdoctoral experience in NMR spectroscopy is required. Experience with troubleshooting hardware and routine maintenance of NMR instruments is highly desirable. Interested individuals should submit a curriculum vitae and a letter requesting consideration to the address below by April 14, 2006. Three letters of reference will be requested after a preliminary screening. Please send applications to: Chairman NMR Search 06, Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2556 or email: head@chem.uga.edu. Be sure to mention NMR-06 in position header.

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Research Assistant II. University of Iowa. Req. # 52370. Salary range $30,302-$40,000. The High Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility (NMR) seeks an organized and detail-oriented professional to oversee the day-to-day operations of the NMR facility. The incumbent will be responsible for the operation, maintenance, and repair of NMR and related equipments used in research. He/she will also help to analyze samples using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of compounds and instruct researchers on the use and operation of a range of solution-state (300-600MHz Bruker) and solid-state (WB-300) spectrometers. Required Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Chemistry/Physics/Engineering; 1-2 years of experience in NMR spectrometry and conducting physical/chemical sciences research; Experience in acquiring and interpreting spectra; Excellent analytical reasoning, problem-solving and communication skills; Experience with WINDOWS and UNIX operating systems. Desired Qualifications: Master's degree in Chemistry/Physics/Engineering; Experience with NMR-related software programs; Experience with web site maintenance; Experience in providing customer service in a professional manner; Ability to work well with others. For information about the NMR Facility, visit our web site: http://www.chem.uiowa.edu/research/nmrfacility.html. Apply on line using Jobs@UIOWA: http://jobs.uiowa.edu/jobsearch/index.php. Requisition # 52370.

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NMR/Instrumentation Facility Manager. The Department of Chemistry at Kansas State University seeks a manager for its shared instrumentation facility, which includes 200 and 400 MHz Varian NMR solution spectrometers and a high-field Ion-Spec MALDI-MS. The successful candidate will be responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the facility (usage scheduling, cryogenics upkeep etc.) and for the training of users. Maintenance responsibilities include regular shimming, optimization of experimental parameters, spectrometer testing, and computer/software maintenance. Applicants must be familiar with NMR spectrometer hardware and software and preferably be able to conduct testing, repairs, and upgrades. To view this announcement, see our web page at: http://www.k-state.edu/chem/general/position/nmr.html. At least two years of specialized experience with NMR spectroscopy/spectrometers are required. Candidates with a B.S. degree in chemistry or a related field will be considered for appointment as a Research Assistant; candidates with M.S. or Ph.D. degrees are welcomed also and will be considered for appointment as a Research Associate. Applicants must be able to work independently as well as with faculty, students, and members of the professional staff. The successful candidate will be given the opportunity to conduct research in collaboration with faculty members at KSU. This research may be directed toward the attainment of a doctoral degree. Screening of applicants will begin on March 15 and continue until the position is filled. Applicants should arrange to have a letter of interest, CV, and three letters of recommendation sent to: Professor Duy Hua, Department of Chemistry, 111 Willard Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 66506; telephone: 785-532-6699; fax: 785-532-6666, e-mail: duy@ksu.edu.

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CSME) is located in the College of Science and Technology (CoST) at The University of Southern Mississippi. CSME has an active graduate program that offers master's and doctoral degrees in science education, with emphasis areas in the various content departments in the CoST. CSME also coordinates with the undergraduate programs in mathematics and science education offered through the content departments and provides an extensive outreach program to local school districts. CSME has created a new nine-month position of assistant director to be filled at the assistant or associate professor level. The assistant director will work with the director to support the various activities of the CSME including 1) working with the graduate and undergraduate licensure programs, 2) teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in mathematics/science education, 3) seeking external funding to support outreach programs with school districts, 4) maintaining budgets, and 5) developing partnerships with the Mississippi Department of Education, Mississippi schools and districts, and state and national educational support agencies. Requirements include a doctoral degree in mathematics or science education and a minimum of three years teaching experience in K-12 schools. The successful applicant should demonstrate experience in obtaining external funding, leadership roles in service organizations, and must meet tenure and promotion requirements within his or her respective content department with an education research emphasis. Please submit a letter of intent, vita, list of references, and copy of transcripts to: Sherry Herron, Ph.D., Director, Center for Science and Mathematics Education, 118 College Drive, Box 5087, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, (601) 266-4739, (601) 266-6145 FAX.

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St. Cloud State University. Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Fixed-term appointment. Salary dependent upon academic qualifications and experience. August 28, 2006. Primary duties: teaching undergraduate courses in preparatory chemistry, introductory organic/biochemistry and major's organic chemistry laboratory. Faculty are required to demonstrate the following: ability to teach and/or perform effectively; scholarly achievement or research; continued preparation and study; contribution to student growth and development; service to the university and community. Ph.D. in chemistry or biochemistry required at time of appointment, Ph. D in organic chemistry preferred. Post-secondary teaching experience desirable. The successful candidate will have demonstrated ability to teach and work with persons from culturally diverse backgrounds. The Department currently has 13 full-time faculty positions and offers an American Chemical Society approved program. Send to: Chair, Chemistry Search Committee Chemistry Department, MS-358 St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498, Phone: (320) 308-3031, Fax: (320) 308-6041, e-mail: nswinter@stcloudstate.edu. The completed application must include a letter of application, vita, transcripts (photocopies acceptable for screening), teaching philosophy, a brief statement of research interests, three letters of reference sent directly from the evaluator. The successful candidate will be required to complete an application form and provide official transcripts sent from the appropriate institutions. All application materials must be received by April 25th, 2006 to be guaranteed consideration.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS AND/OR JOBS

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National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Position Vacancy, Postdoctoral Researcher. Assume a key leadership role in a research team advancing an exciting new interdisciplinary research area at the interface between modern biology and large-area electronics. Perform creative scientific research and develop new electrically-addressed biological microarray technologies. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Silicon Materials and Devices Group and Biological Hydrogen Production Group have begun a new collaborative Team to develop electrically-addressed microarrays for rapid, inexpensive DNA assays and detection. The Postdoctoral Researcher will contribute to planning and performing R&D directed toward Team goals for up to three years. Specific duties include: Planning, performing, analyzing and interpreting scientific experiments. Close collaboration with senior personnel working on project. Development of laboratory techniques for measuring and controlling DNA adsorption and desorption on surfaces and for understanding DNA interactions with rapidly changing electric fields in solution. Clean room definition of macro- and microelectronic pixels and functionalization of inorganic thin film surfaces. Electrochemical and/or luminscent detection of DNA samples. Co-supervision of a physical chemistry graduate student on the project team. Application and development of cutting edge experimental and modelling techniques through knowledge of the latest scientific developments and literature. Adherance to NREL's high safety standards. Presentation of results in team meetings and at appropriate scientific conferences. Publication of results in scientific journals and conference proceeedings. Development of research proposals for additional funding in the field of large-area thin-film electronics for biology. Doctoral degree with specialization in Bioengineering, Bio-electrochemistry, Biophysics, Microbiology, Physical Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, or a related field with an interdisciplinary thesis involving both physical and biological science. Experience in most of the following areas: 1) the functionalization of inorganic surfaces and their interaction with biological molecules and, 2) electrochemical and fluorescent detection of biological molecules 3) solution physical chemistry, 4) molecular biology techniques such as hybridization assays and nucleic acid extraction, 5) basic cleanroom techniques, 6) optical spectroscopy, and 7) electronics and transient electrical measurements,. Communications skills and the ability to work collaboratively as part of a research team. Strong scientific writing skills demonstrated by experience in writing quality scientific papers. Please send resume to: Dr. Howard M. Branz, NREL, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, CO 80401.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON MARCH 20th, 2006.