Chemistry Newsletter - 03/08/2004

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter


XXVIII - No. 10 March 8th, 2004

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Charles Casey’s Talk on Creativity in Chemistry

UW-Madison’s Charles Casey on Creativity in Chemistry, third in the Six-Part series Conversations on Creativity, featuring UW-Madison Faculty on the role of creativity in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities. Presented by the Center for the Humanities, The Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy, and the UW-Madison Arts Institute, Madison, WI. In the third installment of the six-part series Conversations on Creativity, UW-Madison chemist Charles P. Casey will present a talk titled “Creativity in Chemistry”. The program takes place at: 7:00 p.m., on Tuesday, March 9, 2004 at the Alicia Ashman Branch of the Madison Public Library, at 733 N. High Point Rd. The program is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.humanities.wisc.edu or call (608) 263-3409.

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Dean Phillip Certain Retirement Reception

A reception honoring Dean Phillip R. Certain, on the occasion of his retirement will be held on Monday, May 10, 2004, at the Tripp Commons, Memorial Union from 3:30 til 6:30 p.m. For additional information please contact Beth Hartzheim at hartzheim@ls.admin.wisc.edu or 608-265-0457.

 

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 9340 Chemistry

03/09/2004

04/13/2004

05/11/2004

Finance Committee Meetings - Tuesdays - 1:20 PM - Chair’s Office

03/16/2004

04/06/2004

04/20/2004

05/04/2004

05/18/2004

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The Organic cume exams will be given in room 1315 Chemistry Building, 7:00 PM on the following dates:

 

CUMULATIVE EXAM SCHEDULE 2003-2004

April 1

May 6


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SEMINARS

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Tuesday, March 9th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Meloche Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kevin Gardner, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “PAS Domains: A Versatile Way to Build Protein-Based Switches”

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Tuesday, March 9th, 2004 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Joseph Kocal, UOP, IL. “Industrial Research at UOP”

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Wednesday, March 10th, 2004 - Chemistry Department Special Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Cathy Middlecamp, Ph.D., UW Madison, Distinguished Faculty Associate. “Teaching Chemistry: The Intellectual Challenges of Diversity.”

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Wednesday, March 10th, 2004 - Physiology Seminar, 2:00 p.m., Room 281 MSC - Physiology Seminar Room. Arthur Salomon, Ph.D., Novartis Research Found., San Diego. “High-Throughput Phosphoproteomics: Unraveling the Molecular Circuitry of the Human Cell”

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Thursday, March 11th, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Lu Shang, Graduate Student. “Nanowire based detection of biological molecules and species”

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Thursday, March 11th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Emily Dykhuizen, Graduate Student.

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Friday, March 12th, 2004 - Lincoln Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Stephanie Lyford, Abbott Laboratories. “Successful Interviewing Skills”

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Monday, March 22nd, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ben L. Feringa, Stratingh Institute, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. “Progress in Asymmetric Catalysis”

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Monday, March 22nd, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. James A. Fee. “Those Amazing Iron-Sulfer Clusters”

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Monday, March 22nd, 2004 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Ben Feringa, University of Groningen, Netherlands.

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Tuesday, March 23rd, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ben L. Feringa, Stratingh Institute, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. “In Control of Molecular Motion and Organization”

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Thursday, March 25th, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Murray Johnston, University of Delaware. “Mass Spectrometry of Ultrafine Particles: What’s in the Air We Breathe?”

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Thursday, March 25th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Chutima Jiarpinitnun, Graduate Student.

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Friday, March 26th, 2004 - Chemistry Colloquium, 3:45 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Ron Raines, UW-Madison.

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Friday, March 26th, 2004 - Lincoln Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Tammy Argentine, Fisher Scientific.

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Friday, March 26th, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 6353 Chemistry Building. Colin D. Bain, University of Oxford. “Marangoni Effects in Surfactant Solutions”

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Monday, March 29th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Arthur Horwich. “Chaperonin-Mediated Protein Folding”

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Thursday, April 1st, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Xu Zhang, Graduate Student.

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Monday, April 5th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Daniel Lane. “A Novel Mechanism for the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake and Body Weight”

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Tuesday, April 6th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. A. Ravishankara, University of Colorado, Boulder. “Laboratory Investigations of Free Radical Reactions: A Key Component of Atmospheric Chemistry”

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Tuesday, April 6th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Claire Walczak. “Molecular Mechanisms of Mitosis: A Cellular Tug-Of-War”

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Tuesday, April 6th, 2004 - Inorganic Seminar, 1:20 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kohei Tamao, Kyoto University. “Elements Science: Main Group Organic Chemistry Toward Materials Science”

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Thursday, April 8th, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Josheph Lakowicz, University of Maryland. “Radiative Decay Engineering: The Use of Metallic Particles to Control Fluorescence Emission”

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Thursday, April 8th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Amanda Jones, Graduate Student.

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Friday, April 9th, 2004 - Lincoln Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Yi He, Kiessling Group.

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Monday, April 12th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Tim Ryan. “Dissecting Molecular Control of Presynaptic Function”

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Tuesday, April 13th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. David Blank, University of Minnesota. “Probing the Local Environment During Reactive Dynamics in Solution”

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Tuesday, April 13th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Huw Davies, SUNY-Buffalo.

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Thursday, April 15th, 2004 - Joint Analytical/Physical Chemistry Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Minh Cho, Korea University. “Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy and polypeptides: Theoretical perspective”

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Thursday, April 15th, 2004 - Organic McElvain Industrial Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. William Nugent, Bristol-Meyers Squibb.

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Monday, April 19th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Paul F. Cook. “Mechanism of the Haemophilus Influenzae Serine Acetyltransferase”

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Tuesday, April 20th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry McElvain Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Michael Fayer, Stanford University. “Hydrogen Bond Dynamics Probed with Ultrafast Infrared Vibrational Echo Correlation Spectroscopy”

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Tuesday, April 20th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Robert Sheridan, University of Nevada, Reno.

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Thursday, April 22nd, 2004 - Analytical Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Richard Caprioli, Vanderbilt University. “Tissue Imaging and Profiling of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry for Discovery in Clinical and Biological Research”

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Thursday, April 22nd, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Mark Gordon, Iowa State. “A Cluster-Based Approach to Solvation”

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Friday, April 23rd, 2004 - Lincoln Seminar, 12:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Reagan Miller, Lee Group.

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Monday, April 26th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. ChulHee Kang. “Taming Calcium Ion: Its Implication on Drug Side Effects”

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Tuesday, April 27th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Marsha Lester, University of Pennsylvania. “Significant OH Radical Reactions in the Atmosphere: A New View”

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Thursday, April 29th, 2004 - Analytical Meloche Lecture Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Carol Robinson, Cambridge University. “Mass spectrometry of dynamic multi-protein complexes”

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Thursday, April 29th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Emily Dykhuizen, Graduate Student.

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Thursday, April 29th, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. Vern Schramm “Enzymatic Transition States, Analogues, Cancer and Malaria”

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Friday, April 30th, 2004 - Chemistry Colloquium, 3:45 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jim Skinner, UW-Madison.

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Monday, May 3rd, 2004 - Biochemistry Colloquium, 3:30 p.m., Room B1118 Biochemistry. William Theurkauf “The Mitotic Response To Geneotoxic Stress”

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Tuesday, May 4th, 2004 - Physical Chemistry Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Barry Lentz, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “A View of Cell Membrane Fusion: Protein Machines Work on Lipid Materials”

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Tuesday, May 4th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Kyung Woon Jung, University of South Florida.

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Wednesday, May 5th, 2004 - Inorganic McElvain Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Lou Noodleman, Scripps Research Institute.

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Thursday, May 6th, 2004 - Analytical McElvain Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Dr. Charles Cantor, Sequenom Inc. “Precise Quantitative Analysis of Nucleic Acids by Mass Spectrometry”

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Thursday, May 6th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Emily Payne, Graduate Student.

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Monday, May 10th, 2004 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Akinobu Naka, Kurashiki University, Japan.

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Monday, May 24th, 2004 - Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Boris Tumanskii, Technion, Haifa, Israel. “EPR Study of Persistent Linear, Branched and Metal-Containing Silyl Radicals”

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Wednesday, June 4th, 2004 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Joel Schneider, University of Delaware.

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Analytical Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://analytical.chem.wisc.edu/analytical/writings/Seminars/seminars.html.

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Physical Chemistry Student Seminar abstracts/announcements can be found at: http://www.chem.wisc.edu/physical/Home.html.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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NMR Laboratory Manager. The York University Centre for Molecular Discovery has an opening for the position of NMR laboratory manager. Candidates should hold a Ph.D. degree although M.Sc. level candidates with demonstrated experience in the field will also be considered. The facilities at York include a new 300 MHz NMR, a new console upgraded 400 MHz NMR and a four year old 600 MHz NMR that runs primarily biopolymer studies and robotically fed stop flow probe work. Candidates should have had experience in a variety of areas including, but not limited to, computer management and data-base programming, and NMR spectroscopic expertise including 2D programs such as NOESY, COSY, HSQC, etc.. We are looking for someone who is familiar with the hardware aspects of NMR spectrometers and not just applications. Duties will involve filling the magnets and performing routine maintenance on the units, updating software, as well as training new users. Time will also be specified time set aside for the successful candidate to conduct his/her own research. Salary is commensurate with experience and the position is available immediately. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Please submit a full CV and the names and contact information for three referees who can speak to your abilities to: Michael G. Organ, Department of Chemistry, Room 460 CCB, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3, E-mail: organ@yorku.ca.

 

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Research Scientist-Pharm R&D. Groton PharmSci R and D, Groton, Connecticut. Full time position. Ph.D preferred, major preferred: Physical Sciences. Minimum education: Ph.D in Physical Sciences, Desirable education: Ph.D in Pharmaceutics, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering. Work experience: Experience in the development of solid oral dosage forms, 3-5 years experience in discovery support, preformulation of formulation development. Strong written and oral communications skills. Established record of scientific achievement (publications, patents). Candidate should be able to work effectively as a part of an interdisciplinary team. Responsible for formulation development of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms for new drugs candidates, including tablets, capsules, chewable tablets, and fast dissolving formulation studies and for identifying the optimal compositions for immediate release formulations. Responsibilities include the design and supervision of laboratory studies aimed at development of solid dosage forms. Additional responsibilities include supervision for BS/MS laboratory scientists and good oral written communication skills. Job# 29Apr0319115, you can apply to this job online at: http://pfizer.softshow.com/cgi-bin/job-show?J_PINDEX=J371700CM.

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UW-Whitewater. Laboratory Manager I. Starting Date: June 1, 2004. Non tenure-track one year appointment. Subject to renewal contingent upon performance. Minimum of Masters degree in Science or equivalent preparation. Applicants should have sufficient familiarity and experience with a laboratory setting and managerial skills in order to support the smooth running of the science building stockroom, Chemistry Department stockroom and be the Chemical Hygiene Officer for the science building. In addition, this individual should have excellent communication skills and be able to use computer spreadsheets, word processing, and data bases. Ability to provide instruction in safety and other laboratory teaching. The successful candidate will have three areas of responsibility. Chemistry Stock Room Manager. This is an essential position to the Chemistry department. The many laboratories depend upon this individual to: Prepare solutions to an accuracy concomitant with a University chemistry laboratory. This implies that the individual will be able to use analytical balances and volumetric glassware and do the calculations necessary in the preparations of these solutions. Prepare student unknowns. Student grades are determined by their accurately analyzing these unknowns. Should the unknowns not be trustworthy the student's grade would be meaningless. Set up and take down the equipment and solutions needed for the laboratory. Monitor the stockroom during the laboratory periods to prepare emergency solutions, provide students with special supplies, and replace broken glassware. This is essential since the faculty member cannot safely leave the laboratory. Monitor stockroom supplies and general purpose chemicals, ensuring that they are ordered in a timely manner. Be knowledgeable of chemical safety in the preparation, dispensing and disposal of the above. Working with the campus hazardous waste staff on the proper disposal of chemical hazardous waste generated in the building. Use and do simple repairs on pH meters, spectronic 20's, and electrodes. On an emergency basis, teach Chemistry laboratories under the supervision of a faculty member. Train and supervise at least two students to assist him/her in performing the above duties. Science Hall (Upham Hall) Stock Room Manager. Order chemicals for all departments in the building. Store these chemicals in an appropriate manner. Dispense chemicals to all departments when needed. Inventory the building chemicals putting UPS labels on all chemicals and keeping the data base current. Use the telephone and internet to determine the best price of chemicals, supplies and equipment. Chemical Hygiene Officer for Upham Hall. Under the supervision of the Environmental Health, Risk Management, Safety and Loss Control Director. Be familiar with all safety regulations related to chemicals or be willing to train to become proficient and knowledgeable in Chemical Safety. Enforce safety regulations in all areas of Upham Hall (stock rooms, student laboratories, and research laboratories). Provide guidance, teaching, and training to the faculty and others in the development and implementation of the Chemical Hygiene Plan. Conduct regularly scheduled laboratory safety inspections and maintain records on the inspections. Assist with the development and review of the chemical hygiene plan. Monitor the procurement, use and proper disposal of chemicals used in the building. Work with the campus hazardous waste staff on proper waste disposal. Credentials should be submitted to: Dr. Philip T. Johns, Chair, Department of Chemistry, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190, e-mail: johnsp@uww.edu, inquiries only, no applications. Credentials must include a letter of application, vita, an educational summary, all relevant professional experience (including teaching, postdoctoral, industrial, etc.), copies of graduate and undergraduate transcripts, and three current letters of recommendation. (Transcript photocopies are acceptable for initial application.) Applicants must initiate the submission of recommendation letters. Unless confidentiality is requested in writing, lists of applicants must be released on request. Finalists cannot be guaranteed confidentiality. Applications received by March 15, 2004 are ensured consideration. Position is open until filled. Incomplete credential files cannot be considered.

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Analytical Chemists. B.S. / M.S. Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ. The Merck Research Laboratories has positions available in the Analytical Research Department at the Rahway, New Jersey site. The focus of this group is to provide analytical support to synthetic process development. Method development, validation, and documentation are required in addition to providing accurate and timely results. The analytical techniques used include HPLC, GC, chiral LC, spectroscopy, SFC, CE and wet chemistry. Chemist / Staff Chemist - The successful candidate will have an excellent academic record with demonstrated laboratory skills and the ability to work in an interdisciplinary team environment. Experience in chromatography and wet analytical chemistry is desirable. The candidate for Chemist / Staff Chemist will have a B.S. / M.S. degree in Chemistry with zero to four years experience. Interested candidates should send resume and cover letter to: Dr. Tao Wang, Merck & Co., Inc., P.O. Box 2000, RY818-B205 Rahway, NJ 07065.

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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NONE FOR THIS NEWSLETTER

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AND/OR JOBS

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Bruce Palfey of The University of Michigan, Medical School is seeking potential postdoctoral candidates for a position in his laboratory. His group is interested in elucidating the mechanisms of flavin-utilizing enzymes. Several enzymes (many of which are drug targets) are being investigated, including the dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (from the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway), the dihydrouridine synthases (which reduce specific uracils in tRNA to dihydrouracil), and a recently discovered FAD-containing thymidylate synthase (which provides the thymine in DNA). We wish to understand catalysis by these enzymes in intimate detail in order to learn how enzyme structure determines reactivity. Our studies draw from a variety of disciplines, including kinetics, thermodynamics, organic chemistry, spectroscopy, structural biology, molecular biology, and computational chemistry. More information can be found at: http://www.biochem.med.umich.edu/biochem/faculty_research/palfey.html. Candidates should have a Ph.D. or its equivalent in biochemistry, chemistry, biophysics, or a related field. Scientific experience is desirable in several of the following areas: enzymology, kinetics, protein expression and purification, RNA chemistry, calorimetry, molecular modeling, or organic synthesis. Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a brief description of past and current research, and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to me. Applications may be sent either by regular mail or e-mail. Send to: Bruce Palfey, Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan Medical School, 4433 Medical Science Building I, 1301 Catherine Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0606, e-mail:brupalf@umich.edu.

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Applications are invited for a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Fellowship in experimental or theoretical physical chemistry at Hope College. This two-year postdoctoral appointment is designed to prepare a recent Ph.D. recipient for a research and teaching career in the chemical sciences at a predominantly undergraduate institution. The Fellow will initially collaborate in an existing research program of molecular spectroscopy and chemical dynamics, as well as gain teaching experience. The Fellow will then develop an independent research focus for his or her future career. The Hope College chemistry department, http://www.hope.edu/academic/chemistry is ACS-approved, housed in new research and teaching facilities, well-equipped for a wide variety of research endeavors, and well-supported by external granting agencies. Applicants should arrange to have a CV, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, statement of research and teaching interests, and two letters of reference sent to: Dr. William F. Polik, Department of Chemistry, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 or emailed to: polik@hope.edu. Review will begin 4/1/04 for a target start date of 8/15/04.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON MARCH 15th, 2004.