Chemistry Newsletter - 02/25/2002

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Department of Chemistry Newsletter


XXVI - No. 8 February 25th, 2002

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Professor Ron Raines Receives Vilas Associates Award

Ron Raines was recently given a Vilas Associates Award by the biological arm of the University of Wisconsin Graduate School. The Vilas Associates Award is given to recognize and help young faculty who have distinguished themselves through the excellence of their research. Congratulations Ron.

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Welcome to Martin Zanni

Martin Zanni is accepting our faculty offer. Martin is an experimental physical chemist who will be working on coherent two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy. In case you want to contact him, his contact information is: Martin Zanni, Hochstrasser Group, Dept. of Chemistry, Mailbox #73, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323, phone: 215-898-5136, email: zanni@sas.upenn.edu. Congratulations and Welcome Martin!

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Department and Finance Committee Meeting Schedule

Department Meetings --- Tuesdays - 1:30 PM - Room 8335 Chemistry

March 12th, 2002 April 9th, 2002 May 14th, 2002

Finance Committee Meetings --- Tuesdays ---1:20 PM - Chair's Office

March 5th, 2002 March 19th, 2002 April 2nd, 2002
April 16th, 2002 May 7th, 2002 May 21st, 2002

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SEMINARS

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Monday, February 25th, 2002 - Inorganic Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Charlie Riordon, University of Delaware.

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Tuesday, February 26th, 2002 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 1:00 p.m., Room 2317 Engineering Hall. Abraham Stroock, Harvard University. "Patterning Flows in Microchannels"

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Wednesday, February 27th, 2002 - Catalysis Seminar Series, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Greg Whiteker, Dow Chemical Company.

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Thursday, February 28th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Eric Voight.

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Friday, March 1st, 2002 - Rheology Research Center - 3M Lectures, 12:05 p.m., Room 1800 Engineering Hall. Yuri Shkel, University of Wisconsin.

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Monday, March 4th, 2002 - Physical Chemistry Ferry Lectures, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building, Professor Jacob Klein, University of Oxford. "Rheology Under Confinement"

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Monday, March 4th, 2002 - Catalysis Seminar Series, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Larry Que, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities.

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Tuesday, March 5th, 2002 - Physical Chemistry Ferry Lectures, 11:00 a.m. Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Jacob Klein, University of Oxford."Polymer Brushes: From Colloidal Stabilisation to Biological Recognition"

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Tuesday, March 5th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Tim Glass, Penn State University.

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Tuesday, March 5th, 2002 - Pharmacology Seminar, 12:00 Noon, Biotechnology Center Auditorium, Room 1111, 425 Henry Mall. Professor Primal de Lanerolle, University of Illinois-Chicago. "GTPase-Myosin Interactions in Cell Motility and Apoptosis"

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Tuesday, March 5th, 2002 - Chemical Engineering Seminar, 4:00 p.m., Room 1227 Engineering Hall. Daniel Hammer, University of Pennsylvania. "Biochemical Engineering"

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Thursday, March 7th, 2002 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Warren Warren, (Meloche Lecurer), Princeton University. "Femtosecond Laser Pulse Shaping and its Applications"

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Thursday, March 7th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Lisa Jungbauer.

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Thursday, March 7th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Carsten Bolm.

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Friday, March 8th, 2002 - Chemistry Colloquium, 4:00 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Warren Warren, Princeton. "Understanding and Exploiting Intermolecular Multiple-Quantum Coherences; How Everything Organic Chemists Know About NMR Can Be Wrong"

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Friday, March 8th, 2002 - Rheology Research Center - 3M Lectures, 12:05 p.m., Room 1800 Engineering Hall. Jay Schieber, Illinois Institute of Technology. "Molecular Modeling of Entangled Polymers in Single and Double Step Strains"

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Monday, March 11th, 2002 - Macromolecules Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 8335. Dr. Sunil Jayasuriya , S.C. Johnson Company. "Influence of Polymer Structure on Dry Time and Re-solubility of Inks"

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Tuesday, March 12th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Kevin Burgess.

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Tuesday, March 12th, 2002 - Pharmacology Seminar, 12:00 Noon, Biotechnology Center Auditorium, Room 1111, 425 Henry Mall. Assistant Professor Gerd Blobel, Abramson Cancer Center-Philadelphia. "Transcriptional Coactivators: Passive Effectors or Active Regulators?"

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Wednesday, March 13th, 2002 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Lisa Rosenberg, University of Victoria.

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Thursday, March 14th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Wendy Deprophetis.

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Friday, March 15th, 2002 - Rheology Research Center - 3M Lectures, 12:05 p.m., Room 1800 Engineering Hall. Dr. Harry Goldsmith. The Montreal General Hospital. "The Micro- and Molecular Rheology of Human Blood"

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Monday, March 18th, 2002 - Special Chemistry Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Sally A. Sullivan, PhD, JD, Greenlee, Winner, & Sullivan, PC.

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Monday, March 18th, 2002 - Inorganic Seminar, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Galina Bikzhanova, Graduate Student.

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Tuesday, March 19th, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Barney Ellison, University of Colorado. "Organic Aerosols, Free Radicals, and the Fate of the Earth"

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Tuesday, March 19th, 2002 - Pharmacology Seminar, 12:00 Noon, Biotechnology Center Auditorium, Room 1111, 425 Henry Mall. Associate Professor Jan Kitajewski, UW-Madison. "Notch Signaling in Vascular Biology"

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Wednesday, March 20th, 2002 - Inorganic Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Claudia Turro, Ohio State University.

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Thursday, March 21st, 2002 - Analytical Sciences Seminar, 12:15 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Thomas P. Beebe, University of Delaware.

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Thursday, March 21st, 2002 - Organic Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Christopher Ciolli.

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Friday, March 22nd, 2002 - Rheology Research Center - 3M Lectures, 12:05 p.m., Room 1800 Engineering Hall. Paula Wood-Adams, Concordia.

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Tuesday, March 26th, 2002 - Pharmacology Seminar, 12:00 Noon, Biotechnology Center Auditorium, Room 1111, 425 Henry Mall. Professor Peggy Farnham, UW-Madison.

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Monday, April 1st, 2002 - Sprague Lecture Series, 2:25 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dudley Williams, Cambridge University.

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Tuesday, April 2nd, 2002 - Sprague Lecture Series, 3:30 p.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dudley Williams, Cambridge University.

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Thursday, April 4th, 2002 - Sprague Lecture Series, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building. Professor Dudley Williams, Cambridge University.

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Thursday, April 11th, 2002 - Special Seminar, 3:30 p.m., Room 8335 Chemistry Building. Professor Jennie R. Jo, Ph.D, MPH, R.N. "Dying While Waiting: The Fate of Navajo Uranium Miners"

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Tuesday, April 23rd, 2002 - Physical Chemistry McElvain Seminar, 11:00 a.m., Room 1315 Chemistry Building, Professor Richard Zare, Stanford. "Prospects for Advances in Micro and Nanoscale Chemical Analysis"

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The Gordon-Kenan Summer School on Many Body Techniques in Chemical Physics June 16-28, 2002

 

Organized by Shaul Mukamel, University of Rochester and Rudolph A. Marcus, California Institute of Technology

The Gordon-Kenan Summer School on Many Body Techniques in Chemical Physics will be held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, Rhode Island. This should be a unique experience for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

List of Lectures:

Walter Kohn, University of California, Santa Barbara, Density Functional Theory; Concepts and Challenges.

Michael E. Fisher, University of Maryland. Voyages in the Land of Ionic Fluids.

Eugene Shaknovich, Harvard University. Molecular Biological Physics.

Hardy Gross, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Berlin, Germany. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory.

Karl Freed, University of Chicago. Polymer Structure and Long Time Dynamics of Protein Folding.

David Reichman, Harvard University. Molecular Dynamics of Glass Transitions.

Jose Onuchic, University of California at Santa Barbara. Quantum and Classical Transport in Condensed Phases.

Jasper Knoester, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic Excitations in Aggregates.

Irwin Oppenheim, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mode Coupling Theory, Glass Formation and Suspensions.

Branka Ladanyi, Colorado State University. Liquid State Structure, Solvation and Dielectric Properties.

Jimmie Doll, Brown University. Classical and Quantum Monte Carlo Techniques.

Carmela Valdemoro, Instituto Matematicas Fisica Fundamental, Madrid, Spain. Reduced Density Matrices in Electronic Structure Theory.

Morrel Cohen, Rutgers University. Density Functional Theory of Chemical Reactivity.

Ron Elber, Cornell University. Slow Processes in Molecular Biophysics.

Hartmut Haug, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt, Germany. Quantum Kinetics for Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors.

Yoshitaka Tanimura, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan. Path Integrals, Fokker Planck Equations and Stochastic Dynamics.

Graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and advanced undergraduate students are welcome to apply. Applications from women and minority groups are particularly encouraged. Some fellowships will be available subject to funding that is pending. For further information and registration, please check the GRC Web site at: http://www.grc.org/programs/2002/chemphys.htm.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

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Job Opportunities for a Senior Analytical Chemist. Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company. Chemists in Analytical Development are involved in the characterization of new drug candidates and in the scale-up of new processes for the manufacture of bulk pharmaceuticals. The candidate for the position of Senior Analytical Chemist will have a doctoral degree in Analytical Chemistry. This person will be an integral part of multidisciplinary teams that provide support for chemical process development. As a member of these teams, job responsibilities may include the development and validation of analytical procedures, the evaluation of experiments to support process scale-up and optimization, the interpretation and communication of analytical information, and the evaluation and implementation of on-line analysis and laboratory automation instrumentation. The senior chemist will be expected to have excellent communication skills, assume a leadership role, develop supervisory skills, develop expertise in specialized analytical fields, and pursue opportunities for technical publication. A working knowledge of chromatographic techniques, analytical instrumentation, organic chemistry, and statistics are all desirable. Previous laboratory experience in a regulated environment (GLP, GMP, GCP, etc.) is also highly desirable. "Eli Lilly and Company offers a competitive compensation package and a highly professional environment. Present opportunities exist at our Lafayette, Indiana facility. For prompt consideration, please forward your resume to: Dr. Peter F. Gavin, Eli Lilly and Company, Drop Code TL12, 1650 Lilly Road, Lafayette, IN 47909.

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Research Assistantship Polyphenols in Functional Foods. Prof. Jess D. Reed, Department of Animal Sciences, Interdepartmental Program in Nutritional Sciences Environmental Toxicology Program. Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Plant polyphenols are abundant phytochemicals in functional foods that are associated with decreased risk of diseases such as atherosclerosis, cancer, urinary tract infections and ulcers. Our laboratory studies the structural complexity of plant polyphenols in functional foods and the relationship between this structural complexity and effects on atherosclerosis and urinary tract infections. Research on the structural complexity involves chromatographic separations of polyphenols from foods such as cranberries, grapes, pomegranate, sorghum and chocolate and identification by high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Our laboratory researches effects on atherosclerosis and urinary tract infections by a combination of in vitro and in vivo methods. For instance, we determine the relationship between polyphenolic structure and effects on atherosclerosis through experiments on in vitro oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, anti-inflammatory effects in cell cultures of porcine aortic endothelial cells and murine macrophages, and effects on atherogenesis in feeding experiments with familial hypercholesterolemic swine. The successful candidate will be responsible for implementing research in one or more of these general areas as part of an interdisciplinary team of scientists. Highly self motivated individual with a BSc in the biological or physical sciences with the necessary qualifications for enrollment in the Interdepartmental Program in Nutritional Sciences or the Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center. PhD candidates are preferred but MSc candidates will be considered. Interested applicants should contact: Prof. Jess D. Reed, Department of Animal Sciences, Interdepartmental Program in Nutritional Sciences Environmental Toxicology Program. Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1675 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706-1284, Telephone: 608 263-4310, Fax: 608 262-5157, Email: jdreed@facstaff.wisc.edu.

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FACULTY POSITIONS/TEMPORARY FACULTY/ACADEMIC POSITIONS

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Tenure Track Position in Biophysics. The Department of Physics at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) invites applications for a tenure track position in Biophysics. UTEP is a comprehensive urban university located on the US-Mexico border that is strengthening its research program in the context of a strong commitment to education at all levels, as evidenced by the recent Carnegie Foundation of a Research University-Intensive category. The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in Physics or Biophysics or a closely related field. Some background in computational science is an asset. Candidates with expertise in supra-molecular systems, molecule-protein, protein-protein, or protein-DNA interactions in health-related systems are particularly encouraged to apply. The applicants should expect to establish a successful research program that provides research opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students. Resources for research include a scanning confocal microscope used heavily in bioremediation, cell transport and other studies incorporating fluorescent dyes, a Raman microprobe for studies of chemical bonding, an X-ray rotating anode for protein crystallography, and several microscopes (atomic force microscope, scanning tunneling microscopy, transmission, reflection and polarized light microscopes). There is also an ongoing funded program with the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory that supports travel and technical assistance for investigators performing x-ray experiments, including protein crystallography. Please submit curriculum vita, a description of teaching and research interests, and three letters of reference to: Dr. Jorge A. López, Chair, Department of Physics, UTEP, El Paso, Texas, 79968-0555. Application review begins 2-15-2002, and will continue until the position is filled.

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POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AND/OR JOBS

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Postdoctoral Position in Theoretical Chemical Physics at the Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester. One year with a possible extension to a second year. Starting date is flexible. Research Topics: Design and simulation of multidimensional femtosecond spectroscopic probes of structure and electronic and vibrational dynamics of biomolecules and protein folding; Single-molecule spectroscopy; Developing time dependent density matrix algorithms for electronic structure and excitations; Many-body theory of nonlinear optical processes in dendrimers, chromophore aggregates, organic and semiconductor nanostructures; Nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy molecules; Biological Electron and Energy Transfer. To Apply: Send a curriculum vitae, publication list and arrange for two or three letters of recommendation to be sent to: Professor Shaul Mukamel, Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester; P.O. Box 270216, Rochester, New York 14627-0216, Telephone: (716) 275-3080, Fax: (716) 473-6889, Email: mukamel@chem.rochester.edu, Webpage: http://www.chem.rochester.edu/Faculty/Mukamel.html.

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Postdoctoral Research Position in Ultrafast DNA Photophysics, A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the group of Prof. Bern Kohler in the Department of Chemistry at The Ohio State University. The successful candidate for this NIH-funded project will use ultrafast laser techniques to study the dynamics of excited states formed in nucleic acids by UV light. This work will provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage through a detailed characterization of the relaxation pathways for electronic energy. Expertise in femtosecond laser spectroscopy (transient absorption, fluorescence up-conversion) is desirable. Familiarity with basic biochemistry/biophysics is helpful, but not essential. A successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in chemistry, chemical physics, or a closely related discipline. The initial appointment will be for one year from the date of arrival. The start date for this position can be anytime within the next 6 months. Funding is available for additional years upon mutual agreement. Interested candidates should send a CV, and names and contact information (e-mail addresses and telephone numbers) for three professional references to kohler@chemistry.ohio-state.edu. E-mail is preferred, but applications may also be sent to: Prof. Bern Kohler, Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 100 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 USA, Tel. 614-688-3944 Fax. 614-292-1685. Additional information can be obtained by e-mailing Dr. Kohler, or by visiting the group's web site: http://www.chemistry.ohio-state.edu/~kohler/group/.

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University of Washington. James Mayer is seeking excellent candidates for a postdoctoral position. Exceptional candidates with any background are encouraged to apply; candidates should have an interest in chemical reactivity, including kinetics and mechanism. Interested applicants should send a CV with a list of publications and names of at least two references, and should indicate when they would be able to start. A start date in June or July 2002 would be ideal. Any e-mail attachments should, if possible, be Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF files. The position is a joint postdoc between his laboratory and three chemists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Don Camaioni, Jim Franz, and Jim Amonette. It has been funded by the Joint Institute for Nanoscience of the University of Washington (UW) and PNNL. The project is entitled "Redox Reactions of Colloidal Metal Oxides;" the abstract from the proposal appears below. It is anticipated that the postdoc will mostly work at UW in Seattle, with visits to PNNL in Richland, WA for specific experiments. The position is for one year with the possibility of renewal. It includes full benefits (postdocs are considered faculty at the University of Washington). There may be opportunities to gain experience with classroom teaching if desired. Interested applicants should feel free to contact me directly by mail, E-mail, or phone at: Jim Mayer, Department of Chemistry, Box 351700. University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1700, Seattle, WA 98195-1700 fax: (206) 685-8665, phone: (206) 543-2083, e-mail: mayer@chem.washington.edu. Redox Reactions of Colloidal Metal Oxides. It is proposed to study chemical reactions of colloidal metal oxide particles. An understanding of the chemical reactivity of nanoscale particles is critical to their use and to their behavior in the environment. There are a variety of procedures known to make well-defined colloidal dispersions of metal oxides, both in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. Our initial studies will focus on colloidal manganese dioxide as a well-defined nanostructured oxide. Extensions to iron oxides (FeOOH, Fe2O3) and photo-activated TiO2 are planned. These colloidal particles will be reacted with organic substrates such as 9,10-dihydroanthracene, toluenes, phenols, and hydroquinone. Reduction of these particles causes dissolution, which will be monitored optically and by EPR. Because the particles dissolve away completely, the average thermodynamic driving force for reaction (DG, DH) is essentially that of the bulk material. Knowledge of this thermodynamic driving force enables testing of the recently developed Marcus/Polanyi approach to hydrogen atom transfer/proton coupled electron transfer reactions of molecular metal-oxide materials. Successful application of this approach would provide new and important understanding of the reactivity of metal oxide particles.

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Postdoctoral position at Lawrence Berkeley Lab and The University of Rochester. Theory and Simulations of Femtosecond X-ray Spectra of Photoexcited Molecules. This project will be carried out jointly at the theoretical group of Professor Shaul Mukamel at the University of Rochester and the Ultrafast X-ray Spectroscopy Group at the Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkely Lab (R.W. Schoenlein, P.A. Heimann, T.E. Glover, H.A. Padmore, C.V. Shank et al). Its goal is to develop a theoretical framework for simulating and interpreting resonant ultrafast x-ray nonlinear spectra of molecules. The successful candidate will spend time at both institutions, developing a theory for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy. A code for computing charge and current density distributions in molecules with core hole excitations and simulating the optical/x-ray nonlinear response functions will be developed and combined with molecular dynamics packages to allow fully microscopic simulations. X-ray absorption following optical excitation, time resolved pump probe, and four-wave mixing techniques in porphyrins, mixed valence molecular compounds, conjugated aggregates and dendrimers will be simulated. Experiments at the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley will be planned and analyzed. Ph.D. in Physics, Chemistry or a related field. Experience in molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure code development is desirable. Start Date: Flexible-early start date is preferable. TO APPLY: See instructions on the LBL web site, http://cjo.lbl.gov/ under the ALS Department, Job #014480. Also send a CV and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to: Shaul Mukamel, Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0216, Fax: 716-473-6889, e-mail: Mukamel@chem.rochester.edu, Web page: http://www.chem.rochester.edu/faculty/Mukamel.html.

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Professor Milos Novotny, of Indiana University has several postdoctoral positions available in his research group for qualified individuals in the areas of mammalian proteomics and glycobiology. Our laboratories are well-equipped with modern instrumentation for separation science and mass spectrometry. We primarily seek individuals with a good bioanalytical background and interest in biomedical research with mass spectrometry and separations (e.g., LC, CE, CEC). Please address all inquires to: Milos V. Novotny, Distinguished Professor and Lilly Chemistry Alumni Chair, Director, Proteomics Research and Development Facility, Director, Institute for Pheromone Research, Department of Chemistry, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, email: novotny@indiana.edu, fax: 812-855-8300, tel: 812-855-4532.

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Craig A. Aspinwall, Ph.D. of The University of Arizona would like to inform you that his research group currently has openings for up to two postdoctoral associates in the areas of analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. The first position requires an expertise in separation, capillary electrophoresis or capillary LC, of proteins and low molecular weight biomolecules as well as a background in laser induced fluorescence detection and laser spectroscopy. The second position requires an expertise in bioconguation, particularly derivatization and attachment of proteins and small molecules to surfaces and sensing elements, as well as a background in fluorescence imaging. Applications will be accepted immediately until the position(s) are filled. Please have interested candidates contact me directly. Initial contact should include a statement of interest and a copy of the most recent vitae through email or sent to: Craig A. Aspinwall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, 520-621-6338 (o), 520-621-8407 (f).

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Dimitri Coucouvanis of The University of Michigan is seeking to hire two postdoctoral fellows. He is looking for exceptional individuals with background in synthetic structural or mechanistic inorganic chemistry. Interests in the catalytic properties and general reactivity of coordination compounds would also be desirable. Possible candidates should send a vita together with two or three letters of reference. The positions will be open in April 2002 and a starting date in April or May will be most appropriate. Those replying by E-mail please send attachments as Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF files. The positions are for one year, renewable upon mutual consent , and are funded by NIH the project title is: "Polynuclear Clusters in Biology - Structure , Reactivity". Research Description: The oxidation and reduction of various substrates in living organisms are of fundamental importance to life sustaining processes. Multi-electron transfer processes, although less frequent in nature are of equally great importance. Included among the latter are: the 6e reduction of N2 to ammonia in nitrogenase, the 6e reduction of sulfite to sulfide and of nitrite to ammonia in sulfite and nitrite reductases respectively and the 4e oxidation of 2H2O to O2 in photosynthesis, This proposal is concerned with the synthesis and study of synthetic analogs for a) metalloenzymes involved in multielectron reduction and b) the non-porphyrin, non-Fe/S, iron centers active in oxidation processes. Specifically: the synthesis, structures, spectroscopic properties and reactivities of Fe/M/S (M=Mo, V) and Fe/S clusters and of first row transition element carboxylate complexes will be the aims of this proposal. The Fe/M/S clusters are expected to serve as synthetic analogs for the Fe/M/S centers in the nitrogenases and alternate nitrogenases that contain vanadium or iron in place of molybdenum. The new types of Fe/S clusters that will be synthesized are designed as models for the P-clusters of nitrogenase. Supramolecular assemblies with appended Fe/S clusters containing p acceptor ligands will be synthesized, and their possible function in the bimetallic activation and catalytic reduction of dinitrogen will be investigated. Multinuclear, mixed-ligand, carboxylate-catecholate complexes of first row elements will be studied as structure and reactivity models for the active sites in enzymes that catalyze the multielectron oxidation of various substrates. The function of the catecholate ligands in these compounds, as storage sites of oxidizing equivalents, will be determined. Please send to: Dimitri Coucouvanis, Department of Chemistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109-1055, e-mail: dcouc@umich.edu.

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Please submit all newsletter information or address changes to: goldade@chem.wisc.edu or 262-0293. Thank You.

DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 1146.

NEXT NEWSLETTER IS ON MARCH 4th, 2002.